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Reading Josh Smiths article about MVVM his view model CustomerViewModel implements INotifyPropertyChanged but not the underlying Customer class.

I can only see one (feasible) way to make change notification work in that case - only make changes to the CustomerViewModel and not the Customer. In that case, should the backend logic of my program also simply work against ViewModels? That seems pretty weird, they being View Models after all.

Anyone that can clarify this a bit?

Thanks!

Clarification:

Say that I've got a model Quote and a list of Quotes.

public class Quote
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public decimal Value { get; set; }
}

public QuoteViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private Quote quote;

    public event EventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public decimal Value 
    { 
         get { return quote.Value; }
         set
         { 
               quote.Value = value;
               PropertyChanged("Value");
         }
    }                  
}

Now, if Quote changes as a result of a background thread polling a web-service, the UI will not be notified of this, since Quote do not implement INotifyPropertyChanged, unless all parts of the system uses the ViewModel?

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2 Answers 2

I'm guessing that in his example, he is using the notification to propagate changes to one part of the view to other parts of the view. Since the different portions are presumably bound to the same view-model, this would work.

Re logic validation; I probably wouldn't base that on change events anyway; firstly because that would be a lot of even subscriptions (contrast UI, where you only bind things the UI cares about), and secondly it is probably too important to risk missing ;p If the model isn't performing validation internally (as changes happen) then I would just run the validation logic explicitly before commit, looking at the members altogether. This also avoids the "briefly inconsistent" issue, i.e. where you plan to make several changes that result in a valid model, but if you validate immediately it is either really awkward to find a sequence that allows you to make the change you want, or is totally impossible. By deferring the validation, this goes away.

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Thanks, I agree with what you are saying, but I am not immediately sure how it would apply to the case I just clarified my question with. Please look at it and clarify for me! :) –  Max Jul 10 '11 at 12:09
3  
@Max - a background thread updating an object that is bound to a UI is already a pretty dodgy scenario, as it isn't enough to just handle the event - it needs to do thread-switching etc. Indeed, it wouldn't handle that scenario, but here's the thing: models need to be designed to handle only the things that they will acually encounter. Most models don't need to handle the scenario you present. If your model does need that, then it will need to be designed (and tested) in a more involved way. But you don't add that unless you need it ;p –  Marc Gravell Jul 10 '11 at 12:27
    
Well I thought the Model shouldn't be aware that it is bound to a UI or not - I'd think it pretty reasonable that the ViewModel marshals/invokes changes on the correct thread when notified of such by the Model. But it can't be an uncommon scenario that a Model will change in a way not directly related to a View? –  Max Jul 10 '11 at 12:31
    
@max maybe - short version; that is up to you, but indeed the model described won't work that way –  Marc Gravell Jul 10 '11 at 15:40

Marc makes some excellent points, but it sounds like you really need to modify the model outside of the context of your UI. Consider implementing INotifyPropertyChanged on your model, but as Marc mentioned, this will likely be a little problematic and certainly require significant testing. This approach would work best if your model is a POCO. If it can double as a psuedo-VM exposed in all the VMs that use it, then maybe you can minimize or eliminate VM->model event subscription:

public QuoteViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
  private Quote quote;
  public event EventHandler PropertyChanged;
  public INotifyPropertyChanged Quote
  {
    get { return quote; }
    set
    {
      quote = value;
      PropertyChanged("Quote");
    }
  }
}
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