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Can someone please explain in layman's terms:

  1. what a context-free grammar is?

  2. what Backus Naur Form is?

  3. How to use this notation?

  4. How to do string derivation?

  5. How to describe language syntax?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A context-free grammar (CFG) G is a quadruple (V, Σ, R, S) where

  • V: a set of non-terminal symbols
  • Σ: a set of terminals (V ∩ Σ = Ǿ)
  • R: a set of rules (R: V → (V U Σ)*)
  • S: a start symbol

Example of CFG:

  • V = {q, f,}
  • Σ = {0, 1}
  • R = {q → 11q, q → 00f, f → 11f, f → ε}
  • S=q
  • (R= {q → 11q | 00f, f → 11f | ε })

As far as I understand, Backus Naur Form (BNF) is another way of representing the things that are shown in the Context Free Grammar (CFG)

Eample of BNF:

[number] ::= [digit] | [number] [digit]

[digit] ::= 0 | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9

which can be read as something like: "a number is a digit, or any number followed by an extra digit" (which is a contorted but precise way of saying that a number consists of one or more digits) "a digit is any one of the characters 0, 1, 2, ... 9"

Difference:

Notation of these two representations are a bit different, i-e

--> equals ::=

| equals or

there must be some other differences but to be honest I dont know any other :)

String Derivation:

Let S be the start" symbol

  • S --> A, the initial state
  • A --> 0A
  • A --> 1B
  • A --> ?
  • B --> 1B
  • B --> ?

Example of String Derivation:

Does this grammar generates the string 000111?
yes it does!

  • S --> A
  • A --> 0A
  • 0A --> 00A
  • 00A --> 000A
  • 000A --> 0001B
  • 0001B --> 00011B
  • 00011B --> 000111

thats all from my side, I too am working on it and will surely share if I come to know anymore details about defining the language syntax.

cheers!

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In your derivations what are A and B. Not seen it done that way before. –  Andrew S Mar 24 '14 at 1:02

A context-free grammar is a type of formal languages. Backus Naur form is an specification language for this type of grammars. This is describing the language syntax.
You should read:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formal_language_theory
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Context-free_grammar
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backus%E2%80%93Naur_Form

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