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I am not sure if what I am trying to do is even possible, but I figure there must be some work around for it. Assume two routines; routine A and routine B. Both routines A, and B have their own try-catch statements. Routine A will call routine B (shown below), and if routine B encounters some error, routine A will be notified of it.

Here is my example:

// Routine A
private void button13_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        somevoid();
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ex.message); // Never makes it here ...
    }
}

// Routine B
private void somevoid()
{
    try
    {
        int i = 1;
        int z = 0;
        int g = i / z;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
    }
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am not sure what you want to achieve, but it seems, you need to catch the exception in both try catch blocks. If so, change your code as follows:

private void somevoid()
        {

            try
            {
                int i = 1;
                int z = 0;
                int g = i / z;
            }

            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
                throw;
            }
        }
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1  
Don throw ex, that way you will loose the stacktrace information, because you basicaly throw a new exception, just reusing the old one. just throw is enough. –  dowhilefor Jul 10 '11 at 13:15
    
Not good. throw ex will kill the stack trace. You're better off just doing throw. –  Peter K. Jul 10 '11 at 13:16
    
@platon Thank you this is perfect. The other answers are spot on too - thank you guys! Also I feel the need to specify the fact that this is a form app as people (always!) complain about not knowing... –  user725913 Jul 10 '11 at 13:16
    
Yes, you are right! throw ex will kill the stack :(. The throw is better. I'll update my code. –  platon Jul 10 '11 at 13:17

If you want the exception to bubble up to button13_Click then remove the try-catch from somevoid. If you intend to actually have the exception re-thrown in Routine A, then you must:

throw new Exception;  // if you wish, you could have a custom exception here  

or...

throw;  // to simply re-throw the exception

within the catch block of Routine B.

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Insert requisite comment about not swallowing exceptions here.

Now on to answering your question: there are a few things you can do here.

I've seen that some answers have been posted about re-throwing the exception.

You can also throw a specific type of exception (of your own creation) that you can explicitly catch -- this gives you an extra degree of control and specificity.

You could also return bool from method B as an indicator of success or failure. You don't have to actually use that every place where you call method B, but if you would do things differently in method A depending on whether method B succeeds or fails, you can check that result. You'd just return true at the very end of the try block and false at the end of the catch block.

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Just remove the try...catch blocks from your routine B. That way, if there is an exception in routine B, it will jump to the catch block in your routine A.

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you should simple throw an exception on the catch block of the Routine B like that:

 ....
 Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
 throw new InvalidOperationException();
.....

then the Try block of routine a will catch the exception

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Well you could rethrow the exception in your routine B, like

        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
            throw;
        }

That way Routine A can also handle that exception.

Btw, this has nothing to do with winforms, i would remove that flag.

Hope that helps.

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