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In previous thread an efficient way to remove empty lists ({}) from lists was suggested:

Replace[expr, x_List :> DeleteCases[x, {}], {0, Infinity}]

Using the Trott-Strzebonski in-place evaluation technique this method can be generalized for working also with held expressions:

f1[expr_] := 
 Replace[expr, 
  x_List :> With[{eval = DeleteCases[x, {}]}, eval /; True], {0, Infinity}]

This solution is more efficient than the one based on ReplaceRepeated:

f2[expr_] := expr //. {left___, {}, right___} :> {left, right}

But it has one disadvantage: it evaluates held expressions if they are wrapped by List:

In[20]:= f1[Hold[{{}, 1 + 1}]]

Out[20]= Hold[{2}]

So my question is: what is the most efficient way to remove all empty lists ({}) from lists without evaluating held expressions? The empty List[] object should be removed only if it is an element of another List itself.


Here are some timings:

In[76]:= expr = Tuples[Tuples[{{}, {}}, 3], 4];
First@Timing[#[expr]] & /@ {f1, f2, f3}
pl = Plot3D[Sin[x y], {x, 0, Pi}, {y, 0, Pi}]; 
First@Timing[#[pl]] & /@ {f1, f2, f3}

Out[77]= {0.581, 0.901, 5.027}

Out[78]= {0.12, 0.21, 0.18}

Definitions:

Clear[f1, f2, f3];
f3[expr_] := 
  FixedPoint[
   Function[e, Replace[e, {a___, {}, b___} :> {a, b}, {0, Infinity}]], expr];
f1[expr_] := 
  Replace[expr, 
   x_List :> With[{eval = DeleteCases[x, {}]}, eval /; True], {0, Infinity}];
f2[expr_] := expr //. {left___, {}, right___} :> {left, right};
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3 Answers 3

How about:

Clear[f3];
f3[expr_] := 
 FixedPoint[
  Function[e, 
   Replace[e, {a___, {}, b___} :> {a, b}, {0, Infinity}]],
   expr]

It seems to live up to the specs:

In[275]:= f3[{a, {}, {b, {}}, c[d, {}]}]

Out[275]= {a, {b}, c[d, {}]}

In[276]:= f3[Hold[{{}, 1 + 1, {}}]]

Out[276]= Hold[{1 + 1}]
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You can combine the solutions you mentioned with a minimal performance hit and maintain the code unevaluated by using a technique from this post, with a modification that the custom holding wrapper will be made private by using Module:

ClearAll[removeEmptyListsHeld];
removeEmptyListsHeld[expr_Hold] :=
  Module[{myHold},
     SetAttributes[myHold, HoldAllComplete];
     Replace[MapAll[myHold, expr, Heads -> True],
        x : myHold[List][___] :> 
           With[{eval = DeleteCases[x, myHold[myHold[List][]]]}, 
             eval /; True], 
       {0, Infinity}]//. myHold[x_] :> x];

The above function assumes that the input expression is wrapped in Hold. Examples:

In[53]:= expr = Tuples[Tuples[{{}, {}}, 3], 4];
First@Timing[#[expr]] & /@ {f1, f2, f3, removeEmptyListsHeld[Hold[#]] &}

Out[54]= {0.235, 0.218, 1.75, 0.328}


In[56]:= removeEmptyListsHeld[Hold[{{},1+1,{}}]]
Out[56]= Hold[{1+1}]
share|improve this answer

I'm just a bit late with this one. ;-)

Though rather complicated this tests about an order of magnitude faster than your f1:

fx[expr_] :=
 Module[{s},
  expr // 
   Quiet[{s} /. {x_} :> ({} /. {x___} -> (# /. {} -> x //. {x ..} -> x) &)]
 ]

It does not evaluate:

Hold[{{}, 1 + 1}] // fx
Hold[{1 + 1}]

Timings

expr = Tuples[Tuples[{{}, {}}, 3], 4];
First @ Timing @ Do[# @ expr, {100}] & /@ {f1, fx}

pl = Plot3D[Sin[x y], {x, 0, Pi}, {y, 0, Pi}];
First @ Timing @ Do[# @ pl, {100}] & /@ {f1, fx}
{10.577, 0.982}  (* 10.8x faster *)

{1.778, 0.266}   (* 6.7x faster  *)

Check

f1@expr === fx@expr
f1@pl   === fx@pl
True

True

Explanation

The basic version of this function would look like this:

{} /. {x___} -> (# //. {} | {x ..} -> x) &

The idea is to first reduce the expression with //. {} | {x ..} -> x and then use the injector pattern with an empty expression to remove all instances of x, as though they were replaced with Sequence[] but without evaluation.

The first change is to optimize this somewhat by splitting the replacement into /. {} -> x //. {x ..} -> x. The second change is to somehow localize x in the patterns so that it does not fail if x appears in the expression itself. Because of the way Mathematica handles nested scoping constructs I cannot simply use Module[{x}, . . . ] but instead have to use the injector pattern again to get a unique symbol into x___ etc., and Quiet to keep it from complaining about the nonstandard use.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This solution is really esoteric. Could you please explain which value x takes on different levels of nested ReplaceAll and ReplaceRepeated? And what happens to the variable s? –  Alexey Popkov Oct 23 '12 at 3:06
1  
@Alexey for some reason I didn't get notified of this comment. If you look at the "basic version" it's not too complicated. (# //. {} | {x ..} -> x) replaces any empty lists with x, and any lists like {x, x, x} also with x. Then this becomes the right and side of a replacement {x___} -> which "injects" a certain expression to replace every x, with the trick being {} /. {x___} such that x is replaced by nothing. (continued) –  Mr.Wizard Oct 25 '12 at 3:45
    
A second injection is used in the Module to replace every literal x in the pattern with a unique symbol to form a function like: {} /. {s$152___} -> (#1 /. {} -> s$152 //. {s$152 ..} -> s$152) & which is what actually does the job. I don't have time to give a longer explanation and I may not for a few days so this will have to suffice for now; I hope it helps. –  Mr.Wizard Oct 25 '12 at 3:47

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