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Project Euler problem 1 is: Find the sum of all the multiples of 3 or 5 below 1000

Here is my program, using two simple functions to work out the sum of all the multiples of 3 and all the multiples of 5 and then add them up:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;


int threeSum( void );

int fiveSum( void );


int main( int argc, char** argv )
{
    cout << "\n The sum of all the natural numbers below 1000 that are multiples of 3 or 5 = \n" << endl;

    cout << threeSum() + fiveSum() << endl << endl;

    system( "PAUSE" );
}


int threeSum( void )
{
    int sumSoFar = 0;

    for ( int i = 1 ; i < 1000 ; i++ )
    {
        if ( i % 3 == 0 )
                            sumSoFar = sumSoFar + i;
    }

    return sumSoFar;
}


int fiveSum( void )
{
    int sumSoFar = 0;

    for ( int i = 1 ; i < 1000 ; i++ )
    {
        if ( i % 5 == 0 )
                            sumSoFar = sumSoFar + i;
    }

    return sumSoFar;
}

which produces 266333 as the answer. Is this correct, or am I doing something wrong, as the website checker says this is the wrong answer!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As most others pointed out, you're summing the multiples of 15 twice.

Just a hint for another solution:

The sum of multiples of 3 below 1000 is

SUMBELOW(3,1000) = 3 + 6 + 9 + ... + 999 = 3*(1+2+3+...+333) = 3*333*(1+333)/2 = 3*((1000-1)/3)*(1+(1000-1)/3)/2

(All divisions are integer divisions...)

There are similar formulas for calculating the sums of multiples of 5 and 15. To get the overall result, you have to add the sums for 3 and 5 and subtract the sum for 15...

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You have a problem in your math... remember arithmetic sums are n * (n+1) / 2, not (n+1)/2, as you have. –  Ray Jul 15 '11 at 13:41
1  
Ups ... of course you're right. I'll fix it ... –  MartinStettner Jul 17 '11 at 13:47

Another way of seeing this is:

answer = (sum of multiplies of 3) + (sum of multiplies of 5) - (sum of multiples of 15)

these are simple arithmetic series so you don't even need loops.

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Look up the inclusion-exclusion principle, which lets you answer this sort of question without using a loop at all!

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My guess is you're double counting the common multiples of 3 and 5.

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Your solution does not take into account the fact that some numbers (like 15) are divisible by both 5 and 3. You are adding them twice in your sum.

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You are summing up with all the multiples of 15. This is an easy mathematical problem:

In the case of 15, since it is dividable by both 3 and 5, you are counting it twice in both of the functions.

I suggest that you can use one single loop and ||. Of course, a single formula would be better, but that's just mathy, I doubt you will like it:)

BTW, Project Euler is more math/computer science than pure programming, so when in doubt, try to think in a mathy way:)

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