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I know that there are more feasible approaches to solving this problem (db: mysql, oracle, etc...), and I have a mysql db file (KJV Bible), that I can search via PHP code. However, I want to open the Bible.txt file in Python and search for certain strings and return the line and line number. Additionally, (the challenge for me) I want to also return the book in which the line was found (from a flat file). I've been reading and trying to become more familiar with Python. Unfortunately, I'm still lacking the knowledge and skill set to effectively and efficiently problem solve. Here is what I came up with: I thought that if I use the range method to set the beginning and end of a chapter (representing the line numbers), I could hard code a name for each book/chapter (eg.. range(38, 4805) all line between this range is Genesis). This seems to work; I only tried a few books. But the code is very verbose (elif statements). Does anyone know a more efficient approach? Below is a sample of code I wrote to try a few books, and the KJV.txt file may be obtained from Project Gutenberg.

 import os
 import sys
 import re

 word_search = raw_input(r'Enter a word to search: ')
 book = open("KJV.txt", "r")
 regex = re.compile(word_search)
 bibook = ''

 for i, line in enumerate(book.readlines()):
     result = regex.search(line)
     ln = i
     if result:
         if ln in range(36, 4809):
            bibook = 'Genesis'
         elif ln in range(4812, 8859):
            bibook = 'Exodus'
         elif ln in range(8867, 11741):
            bibook =  'Leviticus'
         elif ln in range(11749, 15713):
            bibook = 'Numbers'

         template = "\nLine: {0}\nString: {1}\nBook: {2}\n"
         output = template.format(ln, result.group(), bibook)
         print output
share|improve this question
    
You haven't shown us the KJV.txt file...maybe you can just paste a small excerpt of it. The key part will be figuring out which books are where. Basically you'll need to build an index, which can be more data-driven than your current approach. –  John Zwinck Jul 10 '11 at 17:28
    
Dear @John, even if it was homework: He solved the problem and was asking for a second opinion. There is nothing wrong about that. SO wouldn't be SO, if only the pros would act here. ;-) –  Aufwind Jul 10 '11 at 17:33
1  
And if the user don't enter regex, no need to use regex. Just simple 'in' statement would be enough. –  utdemir Jul 10 '11 at 17:43
    
@John @Druss @utdemir - I added a snippet of the .txt file. –  suffa Jul 10 '11 at 18:08
    
I took the liberty of adding a link to the file at Project Gutenberg and removing the big block of quoted text. –  Gareth Rees Jul 10 '11 at 20:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a very solid start. I've got some suggestions, though.

First, your use of readlines is a bit inefficient. readlines creates a new list of lines from the file -- it stores the whole file in memory. But you don't have to do that; if all you want to do is iterate over the lines in a file, you can just say for line in file, or in your case:

for i, line in enumerate(book):

Alternatively, if you really do want to store the file in memory, perhaps for repeated searching, save the result of readlines to a variable:

booklines = book.readlines()
for i, line in enumerate(booklines):

You can also store the text as a single string with read, though that's not so helpful in this case, since you'd still have to split it:

booktxt = book.read()
booklines = book.splitlines() #
for i, line in enumerate(booklines)

Second, I would say rather than using i as the index variable and then saving it separately to ln, just use a meaningful variable name up front. ln is fine, line_number is clearer but verbose, lineno is a nice compromise. Let's stick with ln here since we all know what it means.

for ln, line in enumerate(book):

Third, as utdemir pointed out in the comments, you don't really need regex for this. Possibly it makes sense if you want your user to be able to enter more sophisticated searches, but REs are complicated enough that they make a questionable default ui. I would just use in for simple substring matching, as in:

    if word_search in line: 

The remaining if statements are fine, and in some cases, this is the best thing to do. However, often in situations that would call for (say) case statements, it's actually better to use a dictionary. Of course, here you've got ranges, so we have to be a bit more clever.

Let's start with a dictionary of start pages. As is probably obvious, this should precede the loop so we aren't redefining the dictionary every time through.

first_lines = {36: 'Genesis', 4812: 'Exodus', 8867: 'Leviticus', 11749: 'Numbers'}

Now we have to map ln to one of these dictionary values. But the odds are good that ln isn't equal to any of the above numbers, and so we cant plug it directly into the dictionary. We could use a for loop to iterate over the dictionary keys (for key in first_lines), store the previous key in prev_key, test whether ln > key, and if so, return prev_key. But there's actually a much nicer way to do it in python. Instead of writing a normal loop, we filter the list, using either the built-in function filter or a list comprehension to remove values from the list that are larger than ln. Then we find the max.

first_line = max(filter(lambda l: l < ln, first_lines))

Here first_lines acts like an unordered list of its keys; in general, you can iterate over the keys in a dictionary just as you would a list, with the caveat that the keys can take any order. lambda is a way to define a short function: this function takes x as an argument and returns the result of x < ln. We have to do it this way because filter wants a function as its first argument. It returns a list containing all the values from first_lines that give a True result.

Since this can be a bit hard to read, especially when lambda is involved, we're probably better off using a list comprehension here. List comprehensions are quire readable and intuitive for most people.

first_line = max([l for l in first_lines if l < ln])

We can even leave out the brackets in this case, since we're passing it directly to a function. Python interprets this as something called a "generator expression", which is akin to a list comprehension but calculates the values on the fly, instead of storing them in a list up front.

first_line = max(l for l in first_lines if l < ln)

Now to get the name of the book, all you have to do is use first_line as a key:

bibook = first_lines[first_line]

The final outcome:

import os
import sys
import re

word_search = raw_input(r'Enter a word to search: ')
book = open("KJV.txt", "r")
first_lines = {36: 'Genesis', 4812: 'Exodus', 8867: 'Leviticus', 11749: 'Numbers'}

for ln, line in enumerate(book):
    if word_search in line:
        first_line = max(l for l in first_lines if l < ln)
        bibook = first_lines[first_line]

        template = "\nLine: {0}\nString: {1}\nBook: {2}\n"
        output = template.format(ln, word_search, bibook)
        print output
share|improve this answer
    
Whatang's comment drew my attention to the fact that there's space between the books. If you want there to be results like "between Exodus and Leviticus", just add that to the dict with the line at which it begins as the key. –  senderle Jul 10 '11 at 19:13
    
thanks for taking the time to not only explain the how, but also the why? –  suffa Jul 10 '11 at 21:27
    
This is a great answer. I'm not sure I'm mad keen about the way you're calculating the name of the book that you're currently in, but kudos for taking the time to give such a detailed answer. –  Whatang Jul 10 '11 at 21:44
    
I noticed a typo in the name of the dictionary: first_pages should be first_lines if I understand the code correctly? –  suffa Jul 10 '11 at 22:14
    
@user706808, quite so, I thought I had caught all of those but obviously not -- thanks! –  senderle Jul 10 '11 at 22:22

Just slightly changed version of your code.

word_search = raw_input(r'Enter a word to search: ')

with open("KJV.txt", "r") as book:
    #using with is always better when messing with files.
    bibook = ''
    for pos, line in enumerate(book):
    #a file object is already an iterable, so i don't think we need readlines.
        if result in line:
        #if result is always in ranges in your question, no need to check other limits.
        #also comparision operators is a lot faster than in.
            if pos < 4809:
                bibook = 'Genesis'
            elif pos < 8859:
                bibook = 'Exodus'
            elif pos < 11741:
                bibook = 'Leviticus'
            else:
                bibook = 'Numbers'
            #you can use string templates, but i think no need for that
            out = "\nLine: {0}\nString: {1}\nBook: {2}".format(
                                            pos, line, book)

            print(out)

Edit:

Now I read your example file. I think seperating the first "1:2" part and using it for learning the book and line number would be a better option.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the corrections ... –  suffa Jul 10 '11 at 21:31
    
I get you now (each "1:2" part ...). –  suffa Jul 11 '11 at 18:19
     if ln in range(36, 4809):
        bibook = 'Genesis'
     elif ln in range(4812, 8859):
        bibook = 'Exodus'
     elif ln in range(8867, 11741):
        bibook =  'Leviticus'
     elif ln in range(11749, 15713):
        bibook = 'Numbers'

is better writen as:

#      (start, end, book)
tab = [(36, 4809, 'Genesis'), 
       (4812, 8859, 'Exodus'),
       (8867, 11741, 'Leviticus'),
       (11749, 15713, 'Numbers')]
for start, end, book in tab:
    if start <= ln < end:
        bibook = book
        break
share|improve this answer
    
appreciate the tip. –  suffa Jul 10 '11 at 21:30

A easy way to avoid the elifs is a loop. It's also much more efficient to test if a number is in range with start <= ln < stop instead of using - range return a list and Python has to compare each element.

import os
import sys
import re


word_search = raw_input(r'Enter a word to search: ')
book = open("KJV.txt", "r")
regex = re.compile(word_search)
bibook = ''

bookranges = [
    ((36, 4809),  'Genesis'),
    ((4812, 8859), 'Exodus'),
    ((8867, 11741), 'Leviticus'),
    ((11749, 15713), 'Numbers')
]


for ln, line in enumerate(book.readlines()):
    result = regex.search(line)
    if result:
        for (start, stop), bibook in bookranges:
            if start <= ln <= stop:
                # found the book, so end the loop and use it later
                break
        else:
            # didnt find any range that matches.
            bibook = 'Somewhere between books'

     template = "\nLine: {0}\nString: {1}\nBook: {2}\n"
     output = template.format(ln, result.group(), bibook)
     print output
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for another perspective! –  suffa Jul 10 '11 at 21:29

You could try something like this. Note that the books appear one after the other, so you only need to record which is the book that you're currently looking at. Also, your approach with checking if the line number is in a range is very expensive, since for each line in the text file, you construct each range, and then do a linear scan to see if the line number appears in it.

books = [("Introduction",36),("Genesis",4809),("Exodus",8859),
         ("Leviticus",11741),("Numbers",15713)]

import os
import sys
import re

word_search = raw_input(r'Enter a word to search: ')
book = open("KJV.txt", "r")
bookIndex = 0
bookEnd = books[bookIndex][1]

for lineNum, line in enumerate(book):
    if lineNum > bookEnd:
        bookIndex += 1
        bookEnd = books[bookIndex][1]
    if word_search in line:
        template = "\nLine: {0}\nString: {1}\nBook: {2}\n"
        output = template.format(lineNum, line, books[bookIndex][0])
        print output

One of the comments pointed out that you may be able to do a more data driven approach, rather than hard-coding the book positions. Do each of the books start with a line or lines in a recognisable format? if so, you could try checking for this and recording which is the current book that you're looking at.

share|improve this answer
    
Just noticed that the end of each book is not the start of the next one. Oops. Still, maybe these lines contain the data you need to recognise the start of the next book. –  Whatang Jul 10 '11 at 18:18
    
thanks for our insight. –  suffa Jul 10 '11 at 21:30

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