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I have an array of int that is terminated with a '\0' created elsewhere in my code. I know it's null terminated because I've tested it.

Say, for this example, the array is [7, 8, 9, 11, 12, '\0']

When I feed it to my function:

int edgesInCluster(Graph *g, int *nodes) {
    int count = 0;
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;
    while(nodes[i] != '\0') {
        while(nodes[j] != '\0') {
            if(i<j) {
                printf("%i %i\n", nodes[i], nodes[j]);
                count += isNeighbour(g, nodes[i], nodes[j]);
            }
            j++;
        }
        i++;
    }
    return count;
}

The printf is outputting:

7 7
7 8
7 9
7 11
7 12

When it should be outputting:

7 8
7 9
7 11
7 12
8 9
8 11
8 12
9 11
9 12
11 12

Which means that for some reason either 'i' isn't being incremented (but we can see that it is) or nodes[0] == '\0' which we know isn't true since the loop with 'j' works fine.

So, any ideas what's going on?

thanks.

P.S. when I change the whiles to for loops, it works but only if I know the length of 'nodes'

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't reset your j after the inner loop.

But why such a horribly verbose code? Try this:

size_t count = 0;

for (size_t i = 0; nodes[i]; ++i)
{
  for (size_t j = i + 1;  nodes[j]; ++j)
  {
    printf("%i %i\n", nodes[i], nodes[j]);
    count += isNeighbour(g, nodes[i], nodes[j]);
  }
}

return count;

(If you want strict ANSI C89, you have to pull the declarations of i and j out of the loops of course.)

Also note that '\0' is a char-literal of value 0, so you might just as well, and more correctly, say 0. And instead of if (x != 0) you can just say if (x), which is what I did in the for loops.

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+1 for '\0' → simply 0 –  Grzegorz Szpetkowski Jul 10 '11 at 18:04
    
Ah, silly me! I write verbose until I know it all works then I can reduce it if necessary. For what it's worth I compile as c99 with -Wall and -pedantic and I get no warnings - seems more important than less verbosity. Thanks for your help. –  Griffin Jul 10 '11 at 18:05
    
@Griffin: But your verbosity was actually obscuring the logic. The for-loops are ideal for expressing the semantics of a ranged loop, so by "doing it manually" all you did was confuse yourself... Also note that my loop is more efficient by starting at the correct value and not having to do the if (i < j) check every time. –  Kerrek SB Jul 10 '11 at 18:06
    
Point taken, thanks. Just out of interest, why size_t instead of int? –  Griffin Jul 10 '11 at 18:09
    
@Griffin: The natural data type for array indices and counts is size_t. It's the return type of the sizeof operator, and usually typedef'd to unsigned int. Since your values are unsigned integers, best to use the most appropriate data type. –  Kerrek SB Jul 10 '11 at 18:11

You aren't resetting the value for j at the beginning of the j loop. That way, after the first loop, nodes[j] is '\0' for all following loops, aborting the j loop immediately.

share|improve this answer
    
Cheers, Kerrek SB just pipped you to the post! –  Griffin Jul 10 '11 at 18:49
    
yeah, his proposal is better anyway. –  Femaref Jul 10 '11 at 18:59

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