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Suppose I have:

<script src="script1.js"></script>
<script src="script2.js"></script>

Both of these scripts have ready() inside. Will the code in script2.js's ready() always execute after the first one?

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4 Answers

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Yes.

First of all, the code in script2.js will be executed after script1.js, as it comes later in the document (and the defer attribute is not set).

Furthermore, the implementation [source] of the ready function is:

ready: function( fn ) {
    // Attach the listeners
    jQuery.bindReady();

    // Add the callback
    readyList.done( fn );

    return this;
},

where readyList seems to be [source] a deferred object [docs]. That means the callbacks are executed in the order they have been added to that object.

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1  
Good job Felix. I was just looking at that part of the uncompressed code trying to figure out how to explain it... –  Jared Farrish Jul 10 '11 at 19:17
    
Thanks for the great answer –  babonk Jul 10 '11 at 19:21
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jQuery uses its own Deferred object for this. The appropriate code of jQuery proves that it is executed in order:

When you call .ready, the function is added to the readyList:

readyList.done( fn );

When the DOM is ready, this function is executed:

readyList.resolveWith( document, [ jQuery ] );

The resolveWith function contains this code which executes the functions added as callbacks:

while( callbacks[ 0 ] ) {
    callbacks.shift().apply( context, args );
}

As you can see, the callback functions are shifted (popped out from the beginning of the callback array (i.e., readyList)), so the first gets executed before the second.

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Nice explanation. :) –  Jared Farrish Jul 10 '11 at 19:17
    
Thanks for the info, upvoting –  babonk Jul 10 '11 at 19:22
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Multiple document ready(s) will be fired in order they are defind.

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.ready() functions are called on first registered get first processed basis

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I would like to see some source attribution for that ... as I understand it it's done with a for..in loop, which means that it uses the iterator over the collection, which you can't gaurantee order using. –  jcolebrand Jul 10 '11 at 20:16
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