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I'm trying to process some JSON into a Java object using some beans and GSON. However, the keys in the JSON code I am using can change over time, based on what is most recently traded. I can manually make a bean file that includes each currency code, but in the end, they can all be different, and my program broken.

Here is my code:

From my main class:

public void updateData() {
    Data data;
    String s = null;
    try {
        s = DataGetter.getJSON("http://bitcoincharts.com/t/weighted_prices.json");
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    s = s.replaceAll("7d", "week");
    s = s.replaceAll("30d", "month");
    s = s.replaceAll("24h", "day");
    s = s.toLowerCase();
    data = new Gson().fromJson(s, Data.class);
}

Data.java:

package tehsusenoh.bittick.get;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Data {

public enum Currency {
    USD, AUD, RUB, GAU, BGN, CNY, SLL, INR, GBP, PLN, SAR, EUR, CLP, CAD
}

private CurrencyData usd;
private CurrencyData aud;
private CurrencyData rub;
private CurrencyData gau;
private CurrencyData bgn;
private CurrencyData cny;
private CurrencyData sll;
private CurrencyData inr;
private CurrencyData gbp;
private CurrencyData pln;
private CurrencyData sar;
private CurrencyData eur;
private CurrencyData clp;
private CurrencyData cad;

public List<CurrencyData> getData() {
    List<CurrencyData> d = new ArrayList<CurrencyData> ();
    d.add(usd);
    d.add(aud);
    d.add(rub);
    d.add(gau);
    d.add(bgn);
    d.add(cny);
    d.add(sll);
    d.add(inr);
    d.add(gbp);
    d.add(pln);
    d.add(sar);
    d.add(eur);
    d.add(clp);
    d.add(cad);
    return d;
}

public CurrencyData get(Currency c) {
    switch (c) {
    case USD: {
        return usd;
    }
    case AUD: {
        return aud;
    }
    case RUB: {
        return rub;
    }
    case GAU: {
        return gau;
    }
    case BGN: {
        return bgn;
    }
    case CNY: {
        return sll;
    }
    case INR: {
        return inr;
    }
    case GBP: {
        return gbp;
    }
    case PLN: {
        return pln;
    }
    case SAR: {
        return sar;
    }
    case EUR: {
        return eur;
    }
    case CLP: {
        return clp;
    }
    case CAD: {
        return cad;
    }
    default: {
        return null;
    }
    }
}

public void addCodes() {
    usd.setCode("USD");
    aud.setCode("AUD");
    rub.setCode("RUB");
    gau.setCode("GAU");
    bgn.setCode("BGN");
    cny.setCode("CNY");
    sll.setCode("SLL");
    inr.setCode("INR");
    gbp.setCode("GBP");
    pln.setCode("PLN");
    sar.setCode("SAR");
    eur.setCode("EUR");
    clp.setCode("CLP");
    cad.setCode("CAD");

}

public String toString() {
    return "" + getData();
}
}

And finally, CurrencyData.java:

package tehsusenoh.bittick.get;

public class CurrencyData {

private Double week;
private Double month;
private Double day;
private String code;

public CurrencyData() {}

public Double getWeek() { return week; }
public Double getMonth() { return month; }
public Double getDay() { return day; }
public String getCode() { return code; }

public void setWeek(Double d) { week = d; }
public void setMonth(Double d) { month = d; }
public void setDay(Double d) { day = d; }
public void setCode(String aCode) { code = aCode; }

public String toString() {
    return code + ":: week:" + week + " month:" + month + " day:" + day;
}
}
share|improve this question
1  
You're probably better off here using String currency names, and a java.util.HashMap<String,Currency>. That makes your code independent of the actual set of currency names. –  Jim Ferrans Jul 10 '11 at 22:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since the nice person that generated the JSON chose to use a JSON object to hold a collection of things, instead of using a JSON array, Jim's suggestion to use a Java Map is a natural fit.

With Gson, here's what that solution would look like.

import java.io.FileReader;
import java.lang.reflect.Type;
import java.math.BigDecimal;
import java.util.Map;

import com.google.gson.Gson;
import com.google.gson.annotations.SerializedName;
import com.google.gson.reflect.TypeToken;

public class Foo
{
  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
  {
    Gson gson = new Gson();
    Type currencyMapType = new TypeToken<Map<String, Currency>>() {}.getType();
    Map<String, Currency> currencyMap = gson.fromJson(new FileReader("input.json"), currencyMapType);
    System.out.println(currencyMap);
  }
}

class Currency
{
  @SerializedName("7d")
  BigDecimal _7d;
  @SerializedName("30d")
  BigDecimal _30d;
  @SerializedName("24h")
  BigDecimal _24h;

  @Override
  public String toString()
  {
    return String.format("{7d:%s, 30d:%s, 24h:%s}", _7d, _30d, _24h);
  }
}

The following update generates a list of currencies from the currency data in the deserialized map.

import java.io.FileReader;
import java.lang.reflect.Type;
import java.math.BigDecimal;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Map.Entry;

import com.google.gson.Gson;
import com.google.gson.annotations.SerializedName;
import com.google.gson.reflect.TypeToken;

public class Foo
{
  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
  {
    Gson gson = new Gson();
    Type currencyDataMapType = new TypeToken<Map<String, CurrencyData>>() {}.getType();
    Map<String, CurrencyData> currencyDataMap = gson.fromJson(new FileReader("input.json"), currencyDataMapType);
    List<Currency> currencies = fromDataMap(currencyDataMap);
    System.out.println(currencies);
  }

  static List<Currency> fromDataMap(Map<String, CurrencyData> currencyDataMap)
  {
    List<Currency> currencies = new ArrayList<Currency>(currencyDataMap.size());
    for (Entry<String, CurrencyData> entry : currencyDataMap.entrySet())
    {
      String code = entry.getKey();
      currencies.add(new Currency(code, currencyDataMap.get(code)));
    }
    return currencies;
  }
}

class Currency
{
  String code;
  CurrencyData data;

  Currency(String code, CurrencyData data)
  {
    this.code = code;
    this.data = data;
  }

  @Override
  public String toString()
  {
    return String.format("{code:%s, 7d:%s, 30d:%s, 24h:%s}", code, data._7d, data._30d, data._24h);
  }
}

class CurrencyData
{
  @SerializedName("7d")
  BigDecimal _7d;
  @SerializedName("30d")
  BigDecimal _30d;
  @SerializedName("24h")
  BigDecimal _24h;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was trying to do something like this, but couldn't get it to work. I found a work around before you posted this. This is much better, but is there a way to include the currency code like USD in the object? How do you access the data once it's in that map? I've never used maps before. –  tehsusenoh Jul 11 '11 at 2:01
1  
"How do you access the data once it's in that map? I've never used maps before." -- I suggest learning the basics first. There are plenty of online resources to learn how to program in Java. –  Programmer Bruce Jul 11 '11 at 3:06
    
"is there a way to include the currency code like USD in the object?" -- Yes, but it would require custom deserialization processing, which is not terribly involved, but since the JSON structure is such a poor fit for the target Java data structure, it's a little easier to just transform the Java objects into what you want after performing the simple deserialization steps demonstrated above. I'll post example code for doing so, which will include getting data out of the Map. –  Programmer Bruce Jul 11 '11 at 3:19
    
I've taken my school's AP Comp Sci course, but we only learned the minimum to take the AP test. I know my fair share about Java, but have only used ArrayLists and the like. My android app is pretty much complete, except for the part where when I try to actually download that json from the internet, I get a stub error. I've been told it's because I'm using the emulator, and actually need a device, which I don't have. –  tehsusenoh Jul 11 '11 at 3:39

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