Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Currently learning Perl, and trying to solve a little challenge to find the sum of even terms from the first 4,000,000 Fibonacci terms. I have created a Fibonacci array that seems to work, and then tried different methods to throw out the odd-valued terms, and continually run into an error when trying to sum my resulting array, getting reports of:

Use of uninitialized value in addition (+) at prob2_3.plx line 23

Here is what I have:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
# prob2_2.plx
use warnings;
use strict;

my @fib; my $i; my $t; my $n;
@fib = (1, 2);



for ($i=2; $i<4000000; $i++)  {
  my $new= ( $fib[$i-1] + $fib[$i-2] );
  push @fib, $new;}


for ($t=3; $t<4000000; $t++)  {
  if (($fib[$t] % 2) != 0 ) {
  delete $fib[$t];  }  }

my $total = 0;

for ($n=1; $n<$#fib; $n++) {
$total += $fib[($n+1)];}  

print  $total;
share|improve this question
1  
please post your actual code; this cannot be the code that throws the warning you mention... – pavel Jul 10 '11 at 21:59
    
@pavel, The code was there, but was badly formatted. Fixed. Line 23 is $total += $fib[($n+1)];. – ikegami Jul 10 '11 at 22:17
1  
This doesn't answer your question--I think the answer below does that. But a better approach to storing a 400k-element array, then filtering, would be to do your filtering in the first loop, and only keep a sum around. It will use far less memory, and won't take nearly as long, since you'll only iterate through the values once. – Flimzy Jul 10 '11 at 22:21
    
@Flimzy: So would you use next if ( ($fib[$t] % 2 != 0) && ($i >= 3) ) to do that in the 1st loop(before the push) ?? – Jon Jul 11 '11 at 14:16
1  
This sounds like Project Euler #2. If so, you want the sum of even fibs with a value below 4e6, not with an index below 4e6. – Eric Strom Jul 11 '11 at 17:17

The warning means you are adding undef to something. delete $fib[$t]; is a bad way of doing $fib[$t] = undef;, which you later add to $total.


You have at least one other error:

The first two Fibonacci numbers are 0 and 1, not 1 and 2.


You have a major problem:

The 4,000,000th Fib number is going to be extremely large, much too large to fit in a double.

For reference purposes,

10,000th has 2090 digits: 20793608237133498072112648988642836825087036094015903119682945866528501423455686648927456034305226515591757343297190158010624794267250973176133810179902738038231789748346235556483191431591924532394420028067810320408724414693462849062668387083308048250920654493340878733226377580847446324873797603734794648258113858631550404081017260381202919943892370942852601647398213554479081823593715429566945149312993664846779090437799284773675379284270660175134664833266377698642012106891355791141872776934080803504956794094648292880566056364718187662668970758537383352677420835574155945658542003634765324541006121012446785689171494803262408602693091211601973938229446636049901531963286159699077880427720289235539329671877182915643419079186525118678856821600897520171070499437657067342400871083908811800976259727431820539554256869460815355918458253398234382360435762759823179896116748424269545924633204614137992850814352018738480923581553988990897151469406131695614497783720743461373756218685106856826090696339815490921253714537241866911604250597353747823733268178182198509240226955826416016690084749816072843582488613184829905383150180047844353751554201573833105521980998123833253261228689824051777846588461079790807828367132384798451794011076569057522158680378961532160858387223882974380483931929541222100800313580688585002598879566463221427820448492565073106595808837401648996423563386109782045634122467872921845606409174360635618216883812562321664442822952537577492715365321134204530686742435454505103269768144370118494906390254934942358904031509877369722437053383165360388595116980245927935225901537634925654872380877183008301074569444002426436414756905094535072804764684492105680024739914490555904391369218696387092918189246157103450387050229300603241611410707453960080170928277951834763216705242485820801423866526633816082921442883095463259080471819329201710147828025221385656340207489796317663278872207607791034431700112753558813478888727503825389066823098683355695718137867882982111710796422706778536913192342733364556727928018953989153106047379741280794091639429908796650294603536651238230626

20,000th has 4180 digits: 1564344347109763849734765364072743458162050946855915883181245417404580803852433819127477934504143316103671237797087184052487157589846395314335101792632666883301188491698850377253383735812017943059782268835280360618754466932406192674904182868594738499500415166599602737300793712012046275485369495600019495004126039595217556097603510836899682827827626851274417838565958464881549888154511565687715162081527027421167926710592169405764372872023265791851279526521097739802047796738013885512616267273220024096214780132567479711643567372517808245262560562426651659391013837988476506124649092538307827326285964637268328029765707984607120961599796336714632362497169952413163370558311283612961033588836334352432860332222878648950508154331165678617373097939647648015552782638392654938551724289386017566932982065441392025369213734676739845068956966278536757235977421127565055467060906533383001625925978595472181091151062798507286798754728450358266089744616465914255799764431508559485853637841082521780322710748029546001980460990695999087046617731317608498316428164179967150350939374702201821818895349621858954893061034598954341939850973673870946183079728029105624782161827626661367017673681922257604178810154438462080217794489109678386881153826838075832058191153133704042628156419344516917867369755345135618986917642004521509538436204298618130363401395547933177643760161135638357088649014469358006518300404036431113143777969391584246934245800739809135619744598808977628245309941537928439431608665523308894967310600529498446943933665468406306292762942409786097847875240014036353917928156220446650579514092031254308059314931618726692376640987446459276331196950780063664171751110087644649773058213117640640085100552927878404516279461437503857017398937097042607258059612257878307007002086913210922626760728342901272768408974906007921227446242552261362505471751722906558235533709070548109789519920405521647836164156675304784097782435865165640401897107828859121831521126567446611716077075769257072773697947064329836969249852382976202348037425889031090020976240691949742160088733357875561841760194799534815496104106903184713919847662253483806138312440578732122855388348848736018217032877013531004653902335692761900988709302797685265501972628217528866551995479526195626503247164073793787381643388365618488630255600890924552511767690989186316859159306438477097458585889829326938198129884953178437411315486719927412151054551726325421747462698125767761987300812744880048122138953746796038485281452086680809803469350470844184375258620810652745992631459076192613797545486775651410699327289089628593588395142531659083933746399666161863597357735290387376161440280731398703030590410957840047591721635117677190494658658256770952605314604687704388833897300447300322491720569722311756874534871145435101596346787454258165870310592717473670917638475152605474446188958081898150393481484970581519902582271877141251593259282483539345792009117894084860435326938689664322383123823631494470354941767039585133484331342468806167901166928052638999423311570618981137348891538818027216596300491989181231598151123614651043205656474490923109982595235880446420678700336717534914381729578113169753046083981752465156933790288020841880688083888166659362896648911608716373579944854235997384986302902608821566689026676371268703303207406827737925274781301986480762462594420398637607893961010824979395439225300832931626540179218558345947558472159906873998923767432504278838419479068093778976997276416592421223235719653905071392295735398272851826350645605643470417155719500185143594804374322010189545136205568856276559806316789533450612097900180399440915139647060459321993254566103255011590902408116018722996267956826555434955409390951728022815209412027248353062982911544674007147249326697275010788100666958314965810320432736615962898175585320993128871046552842068867557341007383399180807449030159797672605530835244157256109268527578172314358255179589605335375414082046575557122636364391407861922824529441261003866098066404526541912783214030236752423547997110159548536582622929575859635210831021463323632502412193578592457118234067116894159316798758933206918936334540039454055299101076302263831614132510576874528929742319396129011617501

Even the 10,000th is too large for a double, and the 20,000th is double the size of the 10,000th, so imagine how large the 4,000,000th will be!


Stylistic issues:

my $i; for ($i=2; $i<4000000; $i++)

is much harder to read than

for my $i (2..$N-1)

with the following at the top to avoid having to repeat the number everywhere:

my $N = 4_000_000;
share|improve this answer
1  
And are you going to offer solutions to the problems you show? – ysth Jul 10 '11 at 22:45
    
@ikegami: You might find a traditional c-style for loop hard to read. Many do not. Your recommendation of for my $i (2..$N-1) is a personal preference, and one I avoid for large N. You are explicitly telling perl to construct a BIG list; an incremental loop constructs no list. – David Hammen Jul 10 '11 at 22:52
4  
@David, @Chas, current versions of Perl special case for (I .. J) so they do not construct a temporary list. It's just as efficient (probably more efficient) as a C-style loop. – cjm Jul 10 '11 at 23:13
2  
@cjm Found it in perlop: "In the current implementation, no temporary array is created when the range operator is used as the expression in foreach loops, but older versions of Perl might burn a lot of memory". I wonder when that changed. Perl 5.8.8 has the same text, so it must have been earlier. – Chas. Owens Jul 10 '11 at 23:51
1  
@cjm It looks like it changed between Perl 5.4 and Perl 5.5 (if perlop is anything to go by). – Chas. Owens Jul 11 '11 at 0:04

As if the fact that the 4 millionth Fibonacci number is more than 10^835950 isn't a big enough problem, this is not very good:

for ($t=3; $t<4000000; $t++)  {
  if (($fib[$t] % 2) != 0 ) {
  delete $fib[$t];  }  }

my $total = 0;

for ($n=1; $n<$#fib; $n++) {
$total += $fib[($n+1)];}  

Why are you walking through the list twice here? Much better would be to combine the two loops into one. You want the sum of the odd terms, so sum the odd terms. Don't delete the odd terms (stylistically very bad) and then walk over the list again, relying on the fact that undef has a numerical value of 0 (but only with a warning).

And mn, the formatting of that code is very, very ugly. Eventually you will write code that someone else needs to read or maintain. My motto: Imagine that the person who will maintain your code is a psychopath who knows where you live.

share|improve this answer
    
I really appreciate the help. Very much enjoying this courting with lady Perl and finding the response to my question incredibly constructive. – NickB Jul 11 '11 at 3:36

As ikegami points out, your uninitialized problem is assuming delete removes elements from an array, when in fact it just sets them to undef (unless they are at the end of the array).

Given the storage requirements of the larger Fibonacci numbers, you don't want them in an array at all; fortunately, there's no need to keep them around for this problem. I would do it like this (takes many minutes to run):

use strict;
use warnings;
use Math::BigInt 'lib' => 'GMP';

my $fib_A = Math::BigInt->new(0);
my $fib_B = Math::BigInt->new(1);
my $sum = Math::BigInt->new(0);

# get the next 3999998
for (1..(4000000-2)) {
    my $next = $fib_A + $fib_B;
    $sum += $next if $next % 2 == 0;
    ($fib_A, $fib_B) = ($fib_B, $next);
}

print "The sum is $sum\n";
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.