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I have an error.php file which can be grossly simplified to:

<?

  if (!isset($error))
    $error = "Unspecified Error";

  echo "Error: $error";

?>

It is not "normal usage" to just navigate to error.php. Rather, I would do something like:

$dbh = mysql_connect($host, $user, $pass);

if (!$dbh)
{
  $error = "Can't connect to MySQL: " . mysql_error();
  include('error.php');
  exit();
}

That said, if the user does navigate to error.php then they will just get "Error: Unspecified Error" as expected.

All my code is working, and the error page shows up and works exactly as expected, however Zend is complaining that $error is undefined on the line: if (!isset($error)).

I realise my design pattern is awful, but I'm just throwing together something quick-and-dirty in this case.

share|improve this question
    
It is undefined, but isn't that what isset() is for really? –  alex Jul 11 '11 at 2:20
    
@alex Well, yes... I suppose so. I wasn't asking because my code isn't working; I was asking because Zend is giving me warnings. At the moment I'm just ignoring them since they're not really a problem. –  Ozzah Jul 11 '11 at 2:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Better idea, create a function instead:

function output_error( $error = NULL )
{
    if( !$error ) $error = "Unspecified Error";
    echo "Error: $error";
}

It has the benefit of both removing the Zend issue, and you have a MUCH better design. Then:

if (!$dbh)
{
  include('error.php');
  output_error( "Can't connect to MySQL: " . mysql_error() );
  exit();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Even if my actual error.php (not the simplified one I put in as an example) outputs a full html error page with head, stylesheets, and javascript? –  Ozzah Jul 11 '11 at 2:30
    
+1, by the way. I think this is the only proper answer so far. –  Ozzah Jul 11 '11 at 2:56
    
At the of the page <?php function output_errors($err){?> at the bottom <?php } –  cwallenpoole Jul 11 '11 at 3:00
$dbh = mysql_connect($host, $user, $pass);

if (!$dbh){
  $error = "Can't connect to MySQL: " . mysql_error();
  if(!include('error.php'){
      echo $error;
      exit();
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Try this: if (!isset(@$error)).

share|improve this answer
1  
Supressing errors is never a good idea. -1. –  Marc B Jul 11 '11 at 3:45

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