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I have a List<String>

List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
list.add("ABCD");
list.add("EFGH");
list.add("IJ KL");
list.add("M NOP");
list.add("UVW X");

if I do list.contains("EFGH"), it returns true. Can I get a true in case of list.contains("IJ")? I mean, can I partially match strings to find if they exist in the list?

I have a list of 15000 strings. And I have to check about 10000 strings if they exist in the list. What could be some other (faster) way to do this?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
"Can I get a true in case of list.contains("IJ")?" What happened when you tried it? – Andrew Thompson Jul 11 '11 at 3:30
    
returned false – y2p Jul 11 '11 at 3:51
    
do you have to know which exact term it matches, or is it enough to know just that it matches one of your terms (without knowing which one)? – Bohemian Jul 11 '11 at 4:09

If suggestion from Roadrunner-EX does not suffice then, I believe you are looking for Knuth–Morris–Pratt algorithm.

Time complexity:

  • Time complexity of the table algorithm is O(n), preprocessing time
  • Time complexity of the search algorithm is O(k)

So, the complexity of the overall algorithm is O(n + k).

  • n = Size of the List
  • k = length of pattern you are searching for

Normal Brute-Force will have time complexity of O(nm)

Moreover KMP algorithm will take same O(k) complexity for searching with same search string, on the other hand, it will be always O(km) for brute force approach.

share|improve this answer
    
What's m in O(nm) and O(km)? Also, check out my simple O(k) solution below. Why won't that work? – Ryan Shillington Dec 29 '13 at 4:34

Perhaps you want to put each String group into a HashSet, and by fragment, I mean don't add "IJ KL" but rather add "IJ" and "KL" separately. If you need both the list and this search capabilities, you may need to maintain two collections.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Yeah, a sort of inverted index. – mschonaker Jul 11 '11 at 6:14

As a second answer, upon rereading your question, you could also inherit from the interface List, specialize it for Strings only, and override the contains() method.

public class PartialStringList extends ArrayList<String>
{
    public boolean contains(Object o)
    {
        if(!(o instanceof String))
        {
            return false;
        }
        String s = (String)o;
        Iterator<String> iter = iterator();
        while(iter.hasNext())
        {
            String iStr = iter.next();
            if (iStr.contain(s))
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
}

Judging by your earlier comments, this is maybe not the speed you're looking for, but is this more similar to what you were asking for?

share|improve this answer

You can iterate over the list, and then call contains() on each String.

public boolean listContainsString(List<string> list. String checkStr)
{
    Iterator<String> iter = list.iterator();
    while(iter.hasNext())
    {
        String s = iter.next();
        if (s.contain(checkStr))
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Something like that should work, I think.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I am doing right now. But this will give me a false if I want to partially match. Also with this I will have to iterate through 15000 entries 10000 times. – y2p Jul 11 '11 at 3:15
    
I'm not sure I understand the question then. I'm pretty sure this will return true on partial match, as you requested, though it's late here so I maybe completely missing a bug in tiredness. Also, as Hovercraft suggests, do you know if they'll be separated in anyway (with a space or another character)? If so, that would make the problem easier. – Roadrunner-EX Jul 11 '11 at 3:23

How about:

java.util.List<String> list = new java.util.ArrayList<String>();
list.add("ABCD");
list.add("EFGH");
list.add("IJ KL");
list.add("M NOP");
list.add("UVW X");
java.util.regex.Pattern p = java.util.regex.Pattern.compile("IJ");
java.util.regex.Matcher m = p.matcher("");
for(String s : list)
{
    m.reset(s);
    if(m.find()) System.out.println("Partially Matched");
}
share|improve this answer

Here's some code that uses a regex to shortcut the inner loop if none of the test Strings are found in the target String.

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    List<String> haystack = Arrays.asList(new String[] { "ABCD", "EFGH", "IJ KL", "M NOP", "UVW X" });
    List<String> needles = Arrays.asList(new String[] { "IJ", "NOP" });

    // To cut down on iterations, create one big regex to check the whole haystack
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.append(".*(");
    for (String needle : needles) {
        sb.append(needle).append('|');
    }
    sb.replace(sb.length() - 1, sb.length(), ").*");
    String regex = sb.toString();

    for (String target : haystack) {
        if (!target.matches(regex)) {
            System.out.println("Skipping " + target);
            continue;
        }

        for (String needle : needles) {
            if (target.contains(needle)) {
                System.out.println(target + " contains " + needle);
            }
        }
    }
}

Output:

Skipping ABCD
Skipping EFGH
IJ KL contains IJ
M NOP contains NOP
Skipping UVW X

If you really want to get cute, you could bisect use a binary search to identify which segments of the target list matches, but it mightn't be worth it.

It depends which is how likely it is that yo'll find a hit. Low hit rates will give a good result. High hit rates will perform not much better than the simple nested loop version. consider inverting the loops if some needles hit many targets, and other hit none.

It's all about aborting a search path ASAP.

share|improve this answer

For starters, for the love of god, please use a set (ex. HashSet) rather than a List. Doing a contains() on a List is O(n), but on a set it's O(1). That a very small fix alone that will save you tons of time.

Now, insert your items one by one, including splitting them on words. For example:

java.util.Set<String> set = new java.util.HashSet<String>();
set.add("ABCD");
set.add("IJ");
set.add("IJ KL");

if you want to partial match words in the middle of the string (not just starts with), add:

set.add("KL");

Check out String.split() to quickly split text based on spaces.

Now, when you're searching, you can do:

boolean isItThere = set.contains("IJ");

Tada! Very simple O(1) searching. This will be extremely fast.

NOTE: assuming 10,000 entries of 10 characters each with an average of 2 words per entry, means we're using < 200k of memory here (10k*10*2 = 200k). If your string sizes grow, or your number of words grow, this could get out of hand in a hurry. Then you should look into something like Lucene.

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