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Given this code:

var assert = require('assert');

function boom(){
    throw new Error('BOOM');
}

assert.throws( boom(), Error );

I get this output, with node 0.4.9:

node.js:134
        throw e; // process.nextTick error, or 'error' event on first tick
        ^
Error: BOOM
    at boom ([EDITED]/assert.throws.test.js:4:9)
    at Object.<anonymous> ([EDITED]/assert.throws.test.js:7:17)
    at Module._compile (module.js:402:26)
    at Object..js (module.js:408:10)
    at Module.load (module.js:334:31)
    at Function._load (module.js:293:12)
    at Array.<anonymous> (module.js:421:10)
    at EventEmitter._tickCallback (node.js:126:26)

This, to me, implies that an uncaught exception has occurred, as opposed to a reported, caught exception. Looking in the docs, I notice that the examples look more like this:

var assert = require('assert');

function boom(){
    throw new Error('BOOM');
}

assert.throws( boom, Error );

But how do you test if it throws an exception given a certain input? For example:

var assert = require('assert');

function boom(blowup){
    if(blowup)
        throw new Error('BOOM');
}

assert.throws( boom, Error );

This will fail. What am I doing wrong, or what secret does everybody know but me?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 18 down vote accepted

The examples take a function, while your sample code calls a function and passes the result. The exception happens before the assert even gets to look at it.

Change your code to this:

var assert = require('assert');

function boom(){
    throw new Error('BOOM');
}

assert.throws( boom, Error ); // note no parentheses

EDIT: To pass parameters, just make another function. After all, this is javascript!

var assert = require('assert');

function boom(blowup){
    if(blowup)
        throw new Error('BOOM');
}

assert.throws( function() { boom(true); }, Error );
share|improve this answer
    
This is what my second example demonstrates. This makes sense, because it needs to call the test function in a controlled environment. But what if the function requires input to throw an exception, like my third example? –  Andrew Jul 11 '11 at 3:56
    
Well, just do what javascript is good at: creating new functions, as in my edit –  Mike Caron Jul 11 '11 at 3:59
    
Ah, I understand now. Thanks! –  Andrew Jul 11 '11 at 6:16

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