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This is the first time I need to ask question to get my query solved before today previous threads were able to solve my queries.

Scenario: I have two tables(lets say A & B) in a database with some same rows and some different rows. Point to note is that both tables have millions of rows or at least more than a million.

Now I have to perform set operations on them like no. of same rows (intersection) , no. of new rows(A-B) and no. of old rows (B-A).

I have two choices: 1) I can perform set operations as query it-self on the database.

2) Or I can fetch the records and perform operations on java.util.ArrayLIst in memory.

But in both the cases its taking too long around 5 to 10 mins what could be the best(OPTIMIZED) approach for this.

Please help.

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Are the records in the table modified? –  The Scrum Meister Jul 11 '11 at 4:58
    
Can you give us the query you used? –  raja kolluru Jul 11 '11 at 10:05
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4 Answers

First of all, union, minus, etc. are not operations on tables, but on select statement results. In your case you are scanning huge tables, create huge result sets and then compare each of the results. This is very slow. You have to optimize in a way that indices can be used.

Second, loading results from DB to Java, and then processing them is inherently slower then to process in the DB, and get ready result in Java.

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Thanks for the reply surely going in for the DB approach. Any tutorial on using indexes to make queries more efficient. –  Vijay Jul 11 '11 at 5:16
    
@Vijay, Create an index for the columns your query uses to match. e.g. the ones which are the same. The query would be much faster if there data was in memory in Java, however to cost of bringing the data in to memory is likel to be much larger than just doing everything in the DB. BTW +1. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 11 '11 at 8:19
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Go for the database approach, because hundreds of man-years went into optimizing the query logic of the RDBMS. I am sure that you do not want to replicate this effort in your client. If using SQL is currently too slow, make sure that all required indices are in place and perform an analysis of the query execution plan (how to do that varies among different database management systems) to find any bottlenecks in your query (such as full table scans).

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Thanks for the reply surely going in for the DB approach. Any tutorial on using indexes to make queries more efficient. –  Vijay Jul 11 '11 at 5:15
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I would leave it up to the Database.

If the tables do not already have a Primary Key, you can create a column (indexed) in both tables that stores a hash of the column values, use that column to do easier comparisons, for instance:

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM a JOIN b ON a.hash = b.hash
    AND a.ColA = b.ColA
    AND a.ColB = b.ColB
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Thanks for the reply surely going in for the DB approach. Any tutorial on using indexes to make queries more efficient. –  Vijay Jul 11 '11 at 5:15
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Are the records in the table modified? – The Scrum Meister

Yes table B will have modified records from table A.

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