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You can find if 2 strings are anagrams after sorting both strings in O(nlogn) time, however is it possible to find it in o(n) time and O(1) space.

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8 Answers

Absolutely no expert here...

But why not go through each string and simply count how many times each letter turns up.

Given appropriate implementation, this shouldn't take more than O(n) time.

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right, but it takes O(n) space. –  shreyasva Jul 11 '11 at 5:35
6  
well, if it uses only letters, then it takes O(1) space, because there are 26 letters and 26 = O(1). ;) –  Petar Ivanov Jul 11 '11 at 5:36
1  
+1 To do it quickly, I would store 2 int[256] arrays, or if you're not restricted to Extended ASCII, int[#] where # is the size of your input character set. Step through with a single unsigned int and increment the value of the int at the character's code point (cast it to an int). Then run over the two arrays and make sure every value is equal. Return NO straight away if one isn't, return YES if you reach the end. –  darvids0n Jul 11 '11 at 5:37
    
@Petar, you raise a good point, what if we have an alien-language with many letter types.. we're lost! –  ghayes Jul 11 '11 at 5:39
1  
@darvids0n Technically, no - your integers are fixed-length, so a sufficiently long input string would require more storage to store the counts, making it O(n log m). But I'm personally of the opinion that that sort of distinction is so anal as to not be worth making. ;) –  Nick Johnson Aug 26 '12 at 22:46
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generate a prime number array[26] each prime number represent a character, then when you traverse the string, multiple each character's prime number, if equal, it is anagrams, otherwise not. it takes O(n) and constant space

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Yes, use a hash and count occurences. If at the end, we have a non-zero figure, then the strings are not anagrams.

let h => hash which maps letters to occurence_count (initialized to 0)

for each letter l in string a
  h[l] = h[l] + 1
end

for each letter l in string b
  h[l] = h[l] - 1
end

for each key l in h 
  return false if h[l] != 0
end

return true

This will run in O(n) + O(n) + c = O(n). Our hash contains 26-letter spots, each with an integer associated with it. The space is therefore O(26) = O(1)

[[Edit]], same as above, but with time-analysis annotations:

let h => hash which maps letters to occurence_count (initialized to 0)

#this loop runs n times
for each letter l in string a
  #hash lookups / writes are constant time
  h[l] = h[l] + 1
end
#above function ran O(n) time

for each letter l in string b
  h[l] = h[l] - 1
end

#runs in O(alphabet) = O(c) = constant-time
for each key l in h 
  return false if h[l] != 0
end

return true
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unsigned char CharacterCheck(char item)
{

    if ((item >= 'A') && (item <= 'Z'))
        return (item - 'A');

    if ((item >= 'a') && (item <= 'z'))
        return ((item - ('a' - 'A')) - 'A');

    return -1;

}

unsigned char AnagramCheck6 (char * item1, char * item2)
{
    char *test                      = item1;
    char *test2                     = item2;
    int count                       = 0;
    unsigned char rc                = 0;
    unsigned char rslt              = 0;

    while (*test && *test2)
    {
        rslt = CharacterCheck(*test++);

        if (rslt != 0xff)
            count += rslt;

        rslt = CharacterCheck(*test2++);

        if (rslt != 0xff)
            count -= rslt;
    }

    if (*test)
    {
        while (*test)
        {
            rslt = CharacterCheck(*test++);

            if (rslt != 0xff)
                count += rslt;
        }
    }

    if (*test2)
    {
        while (*test2)
        {
            rslt = CharacterCheck(*test2++);

            if (rslt != 0xff)
                count -= rslt;
        }
    }

    if (count)
        rc = 1;

    return rc;

}

The following snippet checks for the correct character and converts case if needed. The second and third checks takes into account if the strings are different lengths

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If you transform a words characters in sorted order and hash the String. Every String which has the same hash after sorting will be an anagram(very probable, there is always a chance of collisions) of the other.

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Maybe something like:

    String str1 = "test";
    String str2 = "tzet";
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < str1.length(); i++)
    {
        count = count + str1.charAt(i) - str2.charAt(i);
    }
    System.out.println(count);

Subtract every character from string 2 and add every character from string 1 to count (assuming ASCII characters). If they are anagrams, count will be equal to zero.

This doesn't account for anagrams that have inserted spaces, though.

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str1=cccc str2=bdcc Prints: 0 –  James Aug 15 '11 at 1:55
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the above code would fail to work in all condition

rateher we can go for a quick sort and compare the array while elimating spaces

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Run in : O(n) + O(n) = O(n)

Fix Used Space : O(256) = O(1)

Here is code in Java

private static boolean isAnagramWithOneArray(String strFirst, String strSecond) {
    int[] charsCount = new int[256];

    if (strFirst != null && strSecond != null) {
        if (strFirst.length() != strSecond.length()) {
            return false;
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < strFirst.length(); i++) {
            charsCount[strFirst.charAt(i)]++;
            charsCount[strSecond.charAt(i)]--;
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < charsCount.length; i++) {
            if (charsCount[i] != 0) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    } else {
        return (strFirst == null && strSecond == null);
    }
}
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