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Apologies for asking this here, but my understanding of JOINs is rather shaky and a few hours of messing around hasn't led me anywhere. Here's what I have set up and what I need:

I have three tables, one each for users, locations and checkins. Every time a user goes to a location, they can checkin there. A sample checkin table would be:

+------------+---------+-------------+---------------------+
| checkin_id | user_id | location_id | timestamp           |
+------------+---------+-------------+---------------------+
|         18 |      99 |           1 | 2011-07-10 16:15:59 |
|         14 |       6 |           2 | 2011-07-10 04:49:53 |
|         17 |       6 |           5 | 2011-07-10 16:15:46 |
|         16 |      99 |           7 | 2011-07-10 16:14:00 |
|         19 |      99 |           2 | 2011-07-10 16:16:27 |
+------------+---------+-------------+---------------------+

As you can see, there will be multiple instances of a user and multiple instances of locations. I need to figure out how to, for each user who exists in the checkin table, find out the most recent time they checked in somewhere. For instance, in this case, user 99's most recent checkin was at location 2 (checkin id 19) and user 6's most recent checkin was at location 5 (checkin id 17). I only want the most recent checkin for each user. Is there a way I can get this directly from MySQL? If so, how?

Thanks in advance for your help. :)

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what is the query you have tried so far? cause it looks to me like a simple select where id is ... –  Ibu Jul 11 '11 at 5:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
SELECT *
FROM checkins AS c
JOIN (
    SELECT user_id,MAX(`timestamp`) AS `timestamp`
    FROM checkins
    GROUP BY user_id
) AS x ON (x.user_id = c.user_id AND x.`timestamp`=c.`timestamp`);

EDIT: Explanation as requested:

  1. The inner query:

    SELECT user_id,MAX(`timestamp`) AS `timestamp`
    FROM checkins
    GROUP BY user_id;
    

    Run this query alone to see the output, but it selects the maximum timestamp value for each user_id. Then, by plugging this into a sub-select, we're treating the results as though it were a separate table for the purpose of our JOIN

  2. The outter query:

    SELECT *
    FROM checkins AS c
    JOIN (...) AS x ON (x.user_id = c.user_id AND x.`timestamp`=c.`timestamp`);
    

    This joins the original table checkins with an alias of c (for easier typing) with the results from the first query, using the alias of x. By doing a standard join, only rows with results in both tables are shown--so we're effectively using the join to filter out the unwanted rows.

The final result is that you'll see all of the rows that match the user_id and MAX(timestamp) from the inner query.

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Thanks for your response! I tried inputting it as-is, and it didn't work. What are x and c here? –  khalid13 Jul 11 '11 at 5:35
    
What error did you get? c and x are aliases for the table, and the subselect, respecitvely. Notice the AS c and AS x. –  Flimzy Jul 11 '11 at 5:42
    
x.timestamp didn't work at the on clause. The exact error is: Unknown column 'x.timestamp' in 'on clause' –  khalid13 Jul 11 '11 at 5:51
1  
@Flimzy: You might need to surround timestamp with backticks because it's a reserved word in MySQL. The OP shouldn't have named his column using a reserved word. –  Asaph Jul 11 '11 at 6:00
2  
@Asaph: Thanks for the tip, answer updated accordingly. And @user611922: I've added an explanation to the question. Please let me know if you need more clarification. –  Flimzy Jul 11 '11 at 6:07

This might work:

SELECT * FROM checkins AS a
WHERE a.timestamp >= ALL(
    SELECT timestamp
    FROM checkins AS b 
    WHERE b.user_id = a.user_id
);

Explanation: For every row in the checkins table, we check whether its timestamp is equal or larger than the timestamp of ALL other rows in the checkins table for the same user.

You can read more about ANY sub-queries here: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/any-in-some-subqueries.html

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OMG worked like a charm! Thank you! Do you think you could explain what you did real quick? Or perhaps provide a link that does? Thanks so much! –  khalid13 Jul 11 '11 at 5:38
1  
This will work, but is very inefficient, as it requires doing a subquery for every user in the database. –  Flimzy Jul 11 '11 at 5:45
SELECT c.* FROM checkins c ORDER BY timestamp DESC GROUP BY c.user_id
share|improve this answer
select c2.* from checkins as c2
    inner join (
        select c1.user_id, max(c1.`timestamp`) as recent_checkin_timestamp
        from checkins as c1 group by c1.user_id
    ) as r
    on r.recent_checkin_timestamp = c2.`timestamp`
    and r.user_id = c2.user_id;

Here is a test to prove it works:

mysql> create table checkins (
    -> checkin_id int unsigned primary key auto_increment,
    -> user_id int unsigned not null,
    -> location_id int unsigned not null,
    -> `timestamp` timestamp not null)
    -> engine innodb;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.40 sec)

mysql> insert into checkins
    -> (checkin_id, user_id, location_id, `timestamp`) values
    -> (18, 99, 1, '2011-07-10 16:15:59'),
    -> (14, 6, 2, '2011-07-10 04:49:53'),
    -> (17, 6, 5, '2011-07-10 16:15:46'),
    -> (16, 99, 7, '2011-07-10 16:14:00'),
    -> (19, 99, 2, '2011-07-10 16:16:27');
Query OK, 5 rows affected (0.36 sec)
Records: 5  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> select * from checkins;
+------------+---------+-------------+---------------------+
| checkin_id | user_id | location_id | timestamp           |
+------------+---------+-------------+---------------------+
|         14 |       6 |           2 | 2011-07-10 04:49:53 |
|         16 |      99 |           7 | 2011-07-10 16:14:00 |
|         17 |       6 |           5 | 2011-07-10 16:15:46 |
|         18 |      99 |           1 | 2011-07-10 16:15:59 |
|         19 |      99 |           2 | 2011-07-10 16:16:27 |
+------------+---------+-------------+---------------------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select c2.* from checkins as c2
    -> inner join (
    ->     select c1.user_id, max(c1.`timestamp`) as recent_checkin_timestamp
    ->     from checkins as c1 group by c1.user_id
    -> ) as r
    -> on r.recent_checkin_timestamp = c2.`timestamp`
    -> and r.user_id = c2.user_id;
+------------+---------+-------------+---------------------+
| checkin_id | user_id | location_id | timestamp           |
+------------+---------+-------------+---------------------+
|         17 |       6 |           5 | 2011-07-10 16:15:46 |
|         19 |      99 |           2 | 2011-07-10 16:16:27 |
+------------+---------+-------------+---------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

BTW: It is unwise to name a column timestamp because it's a reserved word. That's why I needed to use backticks around that column name in all my queries above.

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If I'm not mistaken, this will only work if every MAX(timestamp) is guaranteed to be unique, since your JOIN condition only joins on the timestamp, and not on (user_id,timestamp). –  Flimzy Jul 11 '11 at 5:55
    
@Flimzy: Good catch. I corrected it. Also, it's worth noting that in the (probably impossible) case that a user is in 2 places at the same time, this query will return both rows for that user. –  Asaph Jul 11 '11 at 5:57

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