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CODE 1:

x=4    
def func():
          print("HELLO WORLD")
          y=x+2
          print (y)
          print (x) # gives o/p as HELLO WORLD 6,4,4.

func()    
print (x)

CODE 2:

x=4    
def func():

          print("HELLO WORLD")
          y=x+2
          x=x+2 # gives an error here
          print (y)
          print (x) 

func()
print (x)

In the first code, it is not showing any error, it's adding the x value to 2 and resulting back to y and it prints the o/p as 6,4,4. But Actually as I learnt so for, it should point an error because I am not giving the global declaration for x variable inside the func(). But its not ponting any error but in Code 2 it gives an error saying that x referenced before assignment.

The question is can x can be used for the assignment of its value to other variables? Even it is not followed with global declaration?

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3  
This is python, could you please stop using semicolons? –  Jacob Jul 11 '11 at 7:11
    
ofcourse cularis but it gives users more readability if you use semi colons so i used it –  niko Jul 11 '11 at 7:12
2  
In what way is a semicolon increasing readability? It is useless in your code above. –  Jacob Jul 11 '11 at 7:14
    
ofcourse but for me and some people it increases the readability –  niko Jul 11 '11 at 7:15
    
ok sorry from now i stop using semicolon –  niko Jul 11 '11 at 7:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can read global variables without explicitly declaring them as global (Code 1)

But you are not allowed to assign to a global variable without explicitely declaring it as global. (Code 2)

This is because there is no harm in reading, but when assigning you might get unexpected behaviour (especially if it's a long code with many variables and you think it's a unique name you are using, but it's not).

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In the first function you haven't assigned to x, so the compiler doesn't treat it as a local variable. The runtime will automatically get x from the containing scope. You can easily inspect that x is not considered a local variable:

>>> func1.__code__.co_varnames
('y',)

In the 2nd function you're assigning to x, so the compiler treats it as a local variable:

>>> func2.__code__.co_varnames
('x', 'y')

Hence the error you see: UnboundLocalError: local variable 'x' referenced before assignment.

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your right thats the error i see –  niko Jul 11 '11 at 7:17

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