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I have a set of 4 strings and want to generate a list of 16 elements, but with enforcing the rule (or obtaining the same result as enforcing such rule) to never have the same element repeated in two contiguous positions in the resulting list.

Being almost a total newbie in Python I went to check the different methods in the random library and found many different and useful ways to do something similar (random.shuffle would almost do the trick), but no one of those addressed this my particular need.

What data format and what methods should I use?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Pseudocode algorithm:

  1. For i in n (n being the amount of elements you want)
  2. Generate the next element
  3. If it's the same as the previous element, repeat 2

Use random.choice to pick an element from a list of elements randomly.

Here's a proof of concept Python code:

import random
sources = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']      # you said 4 strings
result = [random.choice(sources)]

while len(result) < 16:             # you said you need 16 elements    
    elem = random.choice(sources)
    if elem != result[-1]:
        result.append(elem)

This code is optimized for clarity, not succinctness, cleverness or speed.

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For a more general solution, you could turn to Python generators.

Given an arbitrary iterable of inputs (eg: your four input strings), the following generator will generate an infinite iterable of choices from that list, with no two side-by-side elements being the same:

import random
def noncontiguous(inputs):
  last = random.choice(inputs)
  yield last
  while True:
    next = random.choice(inputs)
    if next != last:
      last = next
      yield next

You can then use list comprehensions or a basic for loop to obtain the 16 element subset of this infinite sequence:

>>> gen = noncontiguous(['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'])
>>> [gen.next() for i in range(16)]
['c', 'b', 'c', 'b', 'a', 'c', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'a', 'd', 'c', 'a', 'd', 'b', 'c']

More interestingly, you can continue to use the same generator object to create more noncontiguous elements

>>> for i in range(8):
...   gen.next()
...
'b'
'c'
'd'
'c'
'b'
'd'
'a'
'c'
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Zart's code modified to (a) work and (b) pre-calculate the set subtractions:

import random

def setsub():
    # 4 strings
    sources = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']

    # convert them to set
    input = set(sources)
    subs = {}
    for word in sources:
        subs[word] = list(input - set([word]))

    # choose first element
    output = [random.choice(sources)]

    # append random choices excluding previous element till required length
    while len(output) < 16:
        output.append(random.choice(subs[output[-1]]))
    return output
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1  
This is a typical speed/space trade-off compared to version that re-tries on wrong choice. Eli's version will probably be more efficient as number of choices grows. –  Zart Jul 12 '11 at 9:34
    
@Zart, I agree completely. I should have said that I only posted this as an answer because it wouldn't fit in the comment I put on your answer. As the number of choices increases Eli's answer will soon win out, or Steve Jessop's technique in a comment to your answer would be fast also but possibly confusing (I had to read it three times to be sure it worked). –  Duncan Jul 12 '11 at 12:11

A rather severe abuse of itertools:

import itertools
import random

print list(itertools.islice((x[0] for x in
  itertools.groupby(random.randint(1, 10) for y in itertools.count())), 16))

It uses islice() to get the first 16 elements of an infinite generator based around count(), using groupby() to collapse equal adjacent elements.

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This is revised Eli's version that doesn't brute-forces elements, and hopefully doesn't lack clarity:

import random

# 4 strings
sources = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']

# convert them to set
input = set(sources)

# choose first element
output = [random.choice(input)]

# append random choices excluding previous element till required length
while len(output) < 16:
    output.append(random.choice(input - set(output[-1:])))
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Whenever possible you should try executing your code samples before posting them: random.choice() can't take a set as its input. When you fix that to use sources in the first call and convert the set subtraction to a list in the second then I make it about 10% slower than Eli's answer. If there were more than 4 strings I'd expect it to get much much worse very quickly. If however you pre-calculate the list subtractions this gets much faster than Eli's answer: (I get: Eli: 50uS, Zart: 55uS, precalculating: 39uS) –  Duncan Jul 11 '11 at 9:51
    
If you're really bothered about performance, you could try randomly selecting an index rather than an element. First index is from 0 to len(sources)-1 inclusive, subsequent indices are from 0 to len(sources)-2 inclusive, but if the index selected is greater than or equal to the previous index, add 1 to it. So you're not messing around with lots of different collections. –  Steve Jessop Jul 11 '11 at 9:59
    
@Duncan ugh, my bad, I haven't checked whether my sample works. I sort of expected for random.choice() to work on sets. –  Zart Jul 12 '11 at 9:30

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