Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

C declaration syntax is fairly convoluted ...

Which brings me to my question regarding casting syntax,

Simple types are easy enough, just put the type in brackets. But what about types like,

int (*2Dap) [5]; or double (*fp) (double, double);

I guessing here, the rule is to just strip away the identifier (plus the semicolon) of a normal variable declaration and put it in brackets.

So, int (*2Dap) [5]; becomes ( int (*) [5] ) and char * str; becomes just (char *)

Is this a general rule?

As so typedef, your new "type" would be what is your "variable" in your typedef declaration,

eg. typedef double (*twoINoneOUT) (double, double); "twoInoneOUT" would be your new "type".

Correct??

Just wanted to clarify. I know I'm unlikely to even need to cast these - could save me from having to typedef unnecessarily though.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guessing here, the rule is to just strip away the identifier (plus the semicolon) of a normal variable declaration and put it in brackets.

Right. This declares a variable called x:

int (*x)[5];

The type of the variable is int (*)[5], and you could cast to that type using the cast (int (*)[5]).

As so typedef, your new "type" would be what is your "variable" in your typedef declaration,

Also correct. This declares a type alias called t:

typedef int (*t)[5];

Syntactically, typedef appears in the same place as a storage class specifier like static.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not typedef int (*)[5] t;? –  JAB Jul 11 '11 at 14:16
1  
@JAB: No - as stated, typedef works like a storage class specifier; it has the same syntax as an object declaration. –  caf Jul 11 '11 at 14:47
    
Hm, I never knew that. Guess it's due to me mainly using typedef with structs rather than arrays and such. –  JAB Jul 11 '11 at 15:12
    
@caf Alright. Thanks for confirmation. –  WanderingInLimbo Jul 12 '11 at 3:14

This might be useful:

http://www.unixwiz.net/techtips/reading-cdecl.html

and this can be useful for what looks like total gibberish

http://cdecl.org/

share|improve this answer
    
I more or less got the declaration thing, as long as it doesn't get too complicated. Was wondering more about casting and typedef usage. Still thanks for the sites, could come in handy. –  WanderingInLimbo Jul 11 '11 at 8:52
1  
If you cast a lot, then typedef first and cast to the typedef. Everyone will love you. –  Kerrek SB Jul 11 '11 at 11:55
    
@Kerrek SB Just curious how to do it without typedefs, if I ever need to do a lot of casting I would probably use typedefs to keep my sanity and leave the "brute force" method for when it's a "waste" to do a typedef declaration. –  WanderingInLimbo Jul 12 '11 at 3:08
    
Well, if it's just to typecast maybe once or twice, declaring a typedef feels like overkill, but I have not written any large programs yet with high levels of complexity - none of what I have done really required using typedef. I will keep your advise in mind when the time comes. PS: Also as I mentioned, I kind of just wanted to know how to do it. –  WanderingInLimbo Jul 12 '11 at 4:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.