Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Need to ask about strange behaviour of SQL Server 2005.

What I need is to find records that contain ']' or '[' in my column

I have a data in column like this

'6b51c65b-5773-415a-aec9-8482c404faef_megas_xlr[1].jpg'

When I run this query

select * from Theme  where BackgroundImageUrl like '%[%'

then no records comes up, but running this below query

select * from Theme  where BackgroundImageUrl like '%]%'

boils following output

'6b51c65b-5773-415a-aec9-8482c404faef_megas_xlr[1].jpg'

What's wrong in that query? What do I need to do in order to search records having closing or starting brackets []?

EDIT..

For more clarification, here is my test data. A[1].jpg B[1.jpg C1].jpg

And below are results that I got after running following combination

A select BackgroundImageUrl from Theme where BackgroundImageUrl like '%[%'

No Results

B select BackgroundImageUrl from Theme where BackgroundImageUrl like '%]%'

A[1].jpg C1].jpg

C select BackgroundImageUrl from Theme where BackgroundImageUrl like '%[ [ ]%'

A[1].jpg B[1.jpg

D select BackgroundImageUrl from Theme where BackgroundImageUrl like '%[ ] ]%'

No Results

What I need is that, Case 1 : I need all records that contains '['

Case2 : I need all records that contains ']'

Query C fulfills my case 1 but I m not able to get result for my case 2

share|improve this question
    
So you want filenames with only a [ OR a ]? –  Jacob Jul 11 '11 at 9:11
    
yup, sometimes i only need to fetch [ and sometime only with ] –  Singleton Jul 11 '11 at 9:14
    
Does my edit reflect what you need? If not, could please post some exampleS? –  Jacob Jul 11 '11 at 9:21
1  
What do you mean "sometimes"? I assume that with a condition that you haven't bothered telling us? –  gbn Jul 11 '11 at 9:32

5 Answers 5

[] are an explicit part of the wild card search:

Wildcard character Description Example
% Any string of zero or more characters. WHERE title LIKE '%computer%' finds all book titles with the word 'computer' anywhere in the book title.

_ (underscore) Any single character. WHERE au_fname LIKE '_ean' finds all four-letter first names that end with ean (Dean, Sean, and so on).

[ ] Any single character within the specified range ([a-f]) or set ([abcdef]). WHERE au_lname LIKE '[C-P]arsen' finds author last names ending with arsen and starting with any single character between C and P, for example Carsen, Larsen, Karsen, and so on. In range searches, the characters included in the range may vary depending on the sorting rules of the collation.

[^] Any single character not within the specified range ([^a-f]) or set ([^abcdef]). WHERE au_lname LIKE 'de[^l]%' all author last names starting with de and where the following letter is not l.

you need to apply an escape clause to have SQL Server evaluate [] as what you are searching for:

match_expression [ NOT ] LIKE pattern [ ESCAPE escape_character ]  

*escape_character*
Is a character that is put in front of a wildcard character to indicate that the wildcard should be interpreted as a regular character and not as a wildcard. escape_character is a character expression that has no default and must evaluate to only one character.

or you can use: Using Wildcard Characters As Literals You can use the wildcard pattern matching characters as literal characters. To use a wildcard character as a literal character, enclose the wildcard character in brackets. The following table shows several examples of using the LIKE keyword and the [ ] wildcard characters.

Symbol           Meaning  
---------------  --------------------
LIKE '5[%]'      5%
LIKE '[_]n'      _n
LIKE '[a-cdf]'   a, b, c, d, or f
LIKE '[-acdf]'   -, a, c, d, or f
LIKE '[ [ ]'     [
LIKE ']'         ]
LIKE 'abc[_]d%'  abc_d and abc_de
LIKE 'abc[def]'  abcd, abce, and abcf
share|improve this answer
    
Nice Explanation. +1 –  Logan Jul 11 '11 at 12:30

LIKE (Transact-SQL)

[] is used to identify ranges in a LIKE-clause.

The documentation linked above has following solution:

Using Wildcard Characters As Literals

You can use the wildcard pattern matching characters as literal characters. To use a wildcard character as a literal character, enclose the wildcard character in brackets. The following table shows several examples of using the LIKE keyword and the [ ] wildcard characters.

Symbol       | Meaning
LIKE '[ [ ]' | [
LIKE ']'     | ]

Your query would have to look like this:

select * from Theme  where BackgroundImageUrl like '%[ [ ]%'

Edit: Assuming you only want files that either have a [ OR a ], but not both:

select * from Theme  where (BackgroundImageURL like '%]%' AND BackgroundImageURL  not like '%[[]%')  or (BackgroundImageURL  like '%[[]%' AND BackgroundImageURL  not like '%]%') 
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, in this case, it is bringing records with spaces to and some of the records which dont have [ at all =( –  Singleton Jul 11 '11 at 9:04
    
The spaces in '%[ [ ]%' are undoubtedly added for clarity, remove them in the real query. –  Hans Kesting Jul 11 '11 at 9:31

You have to escape the opening bracket:

LIKE '%[[]% 

but you don't have to escape the closing one (as you noted)

The rest of the "sometimes" logic is up to you. Or a new, complete, question. We've answered this one.

share|improve this answer

From here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms179859.aspx

Get the rows containing [ or ] like this.

declare @T table (S varchar(100))

insert into @T values ('A[1].jpg')
insert into @T values ('B[1.jpg')
insert into @T values ('C1].jpg')

select *
from @T
where S like '%[[]%' or
      S like '%]%'

Result;

S
---------
A[1].jpg
B[1.jpg
C1].jpg
share|improve this answer
    
yes i know that but its bringing both records having [ or ] , i need to pick [ and sometimes only with ] –  Singleton Jul 11 '11 at 9:03
    
@Singleton - Not for me. –  Mikael Eriksson Jul 11 '11 at 9:06
    
this is becouse you dont have any records containing ] –  Singleton Jul 11 '11 at 13:15
    
@Singleton – Think I know what you want now. You can do this with two like statements in the where clause. –  Mikael Eriksson Jul 11 '11 at 13:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well i just discovered my answer.

select * from Theme  where BackgroundImageUrl like  '%\]%' ESCAPE '\'

and

select * from Theme  where BackgroundImageUrl like  '%\[%' ESCAPE '\'
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.