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I've just started using the mvc-mini-profiler (http://code.google.com/p/mvc-mini-profiler/) and I think it's awesome. However, I'm getting some odd behaviour while using it.

I've got an ASP.NET Webforms site running on IIS7.5 and for some reason when I load a page with the profiler enabled, I not only get a time measurement for the aspx page, but I also get it for random css and js resources on the page.

The aspx profile works correctly, with the SQL query also being profiled correctly. However, as the picture shows I also get a bunch of other results which appear to be results for static CSS and JS files. As far as I can tell, these are being served up statically by IIS, so the profiler code shouldn't even be invoked for these.

The relevant parts of my Global.asax are:

    protected void Application_BeginRequest()
    {
        MiniProfiler profiler = null;

        // might want to decide here (or maybe inside the action) whether you want
        // to profile this request - for example, using an "IsSystemAdmin" flag against
        // the user, or similar; this could also all be done in action filters, but this
        // is simple and practical; just return null for most users. For our test, we'll
        // profile only for local requests (seems reasonable)
        profiler = MiniProfiler.Start();

        using (profiler.Step("Application_BeginRequest"))
        {
            // you can start profiling your code immediately
        }
    }

    protected void Application_EndRequest()
    {
        MvcMiniProfiler.MiniProfiler.Stop();
    }

    protected void Application_AuthenticateRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (User == null || !User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
        {
            MvcMiniProfiler.MiniProfiler.Stop(true);
        }
    }

Is this behaviour expected?

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2 Answers

up vote 41 down vote accepted

Yes this is correct but it is very easy to filter these out.

Taken from the sample code in the project Source

void Application_Start(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // Code that runs on application startup

    // some things should never be seen
    var ignored = MiniProfiler.Settings.IgnoredPaths.ToList();

    ignored.Add("WebResource.axd");
    ignored.Add("/Styles/");

    MiniProfiler.Settings.IgnoredPaths = ignored.ToArray();
}

This lets you filter out what you want to see or not this is a sample of what I have excluded in my web application which i am finding is working for my application

ignored.Add("WebResource.axd");
ignored.Add("ScriptResource.axd");
ignored.Add("/Styles/");
ignored.Add("/Images/");
ignored.Add(".js");
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I had to update my version of the profiler, but this appears to have worked.... –  growse Jul 11 '11 at 13:26
    
One thing i noticed with the latest code is there is some debug code that has been left in and causes some issues with IE. I have logged an issue on the issue tracker Issue 53 –  Mike B Jul 11 '11 at 13:34
    
I'll keep an eye out - thanks. All our devs are on Chrome/FF, so I'm not that worried. –  growse Jul 11 '11 at 13:35
    
omg thank you, i've been looking for this for a while –  Allen Rice Jan 30 '12 at 0:42
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You can actually put that in one line and also omit the slashes. Like this:

    protected void Application_BeginRequest()
    {
        if (Request.IsLocal)
        {
            MiniProfiler.Start();
            MiniProfiler.Settings.IgnoredPaths = new[] { "static", "webresource.axd", "styles", "images" };
        }
     }
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