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why is this not working ? It's something about the commandstring syntax near = but I can't seem to figure it out, the online examples seem exactly the same. Edit: Activated In is a column.

examples from How to select data from database with many filter options?

private void btnDist_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string cmdText = "SELECT * FROM Inventory WHERE Rep <> '#NA' AND Activated In = '#NA'";
    SqlDataAdapter adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(cmdText, GetConnection());
    DataSet distDS = new DataSet();
    adapter.Fill(distDS);

    dataGridView1.DataSource = distDS.Tables[0].DefaultView;
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If the name of the column on your database is Activated In (with a space) then you need to use square brackets when referring to the object / column name in queries, for example:

SELECT * FROM Inventory WHERE Rep <> '#NA' AND [Activated In] = '#NA'

This is because SQL treats spaces as a separator in the query language - square brackets are used to "escape" this (and other characters) in names.

Alternatively if the column is just called Activated then you don't need the IN bit - either test for equality or test to see if the value is in a given range, but don't do both.

-- Use this
SELECT * FROM Inventory WHERE Rep <> '#NA' AND Activated = '#NA'
-- Or this
SELECT * FROM Inventory WHERE Rep <> '#NA' AND Activated IN ('#NA', 'Some other value')
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2  
Which is why you should avoid using spaces or keywords in the table design inteh first place. If this is a new table not yet pushed to prod, I would immediately fix the fieldname. –  HLGEM Jul 11 '11 at 18:01
    
@HLGEM , thanks for the pointer, I'm still a little nooblet. –  Dani Jul 15 '11 at 13:37
    
@Kragen, thanks a lot for the answer man, Activated In is(was) a column name so the brackets fixed the problem. Wouldn't even know what the actual IN keyword is for –  Dani Jul 15 '11 at 13:39

change you query to There is no need of IN keyword

SELECT * FROM Inventory WHERE Rep <> '#NA' AND Activated = '#NA'"

IN - used when you want to filter out data from the list or subquery is there.

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The In keyword is used as follows:

...AND Activated IN ('#NA')
...AND Activated IN ('#NA', 'other filter value', 'more filter values')
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Activated In = '#NA'"

This needs to be Activated In ('#NA')" or Activated = '#NA'".
The In operator in SQL is reserved.

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Remove the = after In

string cmdText = "SELECT * FROM Inventory WHERE Rep <> '#NA' AND Activated In ('#NA')";

You might also want to use = instead of In since you are only specifying one item.

string cmdText = "SELECT * FROM Inventory WHERE Rep <> '#NA' AND Activated = '#NA'";

If Activated In is a column, then use:

string cmdText = "SELECT * FROM Inventory WHERE Rep <> '#NA' AND [Activated In] = '#NA'";
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Activated In is a column ? then it should have been ActivatedIn or [Activated In]

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