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Say i have this markup:

<div class='current'>
</div>
<div class='current'>
</div>
<div class='current'>
</div>
<div class='current'>
</div>
<div class='current'>
</div>

Now these divs are not necessarily next to each other in the markup, but could be spread throughout the page.

Can i target only the first occurrence of class "current" using CSS only, i'd ideally like to avoid using javascript (for now)?

Ie.

.current:first-child {
background: red;
}
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When you say they're spread all over the page, does it mean they occur just about anywhere in the page or do they all at least have a common parent? –  BoltClock Jul 11 '11 at 12:07
    
Yes, they have a common parent of div class="group" –  benhowdle89 Jul 11 '11 at 12:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I believe you're looking for something like this:

.current:nth-child(1){
    background:red;
}

Should do the trick!

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2  
Uhhh, how is :nth-child(1) different from :first-child, besides the fact that the former doesn't work on IE7 and IE8 while the latter does? –  BoltClock Jul 11 '11 at 12:06
    
I have added the test with :first-child - webdevout.net/test?019 Works great. –  spliter Jul 11 '11 at 12:14

As mentioned in these two answers (along with this new one), CSS3 doesn't bake in a pseudo-class that selects the first element of its class (unlike :first-of-type which selects by type).

You can always use :first-child if .current is guaranteed to be the first child of .group:

.group .current:first-child {
    background: red;
}

But if it's not guaranteed to be, then based on your comments and the answer link, since they all share the same parent you can do this instead:

.group .current {
    background: red;
}

.group .current ~ .current {
    background: transparent; /* Or whatever your default is */
}

The general sibling combinator ~ ignores other elements that may not be .current. All these rules work in IE7+.

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as metioned in the comment above, I have added the test page with :first-child at webdevout.net/test?019 and it shows that you can select the first .current even without all of the .current being placed within the same parent or any particular order. Am I missing something? –  spliter Jul 11 '11 at 12:22
    
@spliter: The one that's highlighted is the first child of html body ul li so it gets matched. If you move the ul elsewhere, that div would still be matched. –  BoltClock Jul 11 '11 at 12:24
    
You are absolutely right, @BoltClock. Tried that and indeed, the test was not very accurate in this case. Thanks for the explanation. –  spliter Jul 11 '11 at 12:30

:first-child targets elements that are first children, not first occurrence of a given class. So this will target all elements with current class, that are first children. It can be all of them if they are in different places on a page or none at all.

It sounds like you may be looking for css3 selector first-of-type

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what about nth-child(1)? –  benhowdle89 Jul 11 '11 at 11:52

If they are spread throughout the page, you can not get what you need with pure CSS solution. Even with first-of-type unless the elements are on the same DOM level. Check the example to see that you can not select the elements.

On the other hand once I move the third .current to the same DOM level where I already have the second one, I get only the second item selected, as it's the first .current on this level.

On the other hand it's a very short one-liner in JS

Don't overcomplicate things ;)

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If it's spread throughout the page, you can't target it with css.

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