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This is a pretty straightforward question and I'm trying to bridge the gaps in my knowledge.

Quite simply the applications work as follows: 1: i: web app creates a hash of values 1: ii: Turns this hash into JSON 1: iii: Sends the JSON across to another application via POST THIS IS THE MAIN QUESTION

2: i: other web app receives the JSON, deserializes and turns back into an object.

@hostURL = 'http://127.0.0.1:20000/sendJson'

For 1 I've got i and ii done. Not too difficult.

@myHash = HASH.new
    @myHash =
    {
      "myString" => 'testestestes'
      "myInteger" => 20
    }

    @myJsonHash = @myHas.to_json

Sending a post request in my application looks like this:

  res = Net::HTTP.post_form(URI.parse(@hostURL),
    {'myString'=>'testestestest, 'myInteger' => 20})

However I'm at a loss as to how to send the JSON hash across through post.

As for 2:

  @request = UserRequest.new({:myString => params[:myString], :myInteger => params[:myInteger] })
           if @request.save
    #ok
      puts "OBJECT CREATED AND SAVED"
    else
    #error
      puts "SOMETHING WENT WRONG WITH OBJECT CREATION"

Would this suffice as I hear Rails automatically deserializes on receiving a request.


On a side note: What should the response be?

These are 2 web apps communicating so returning some html would be bad. Possibly a numeric response? 200? 404?

Are there any industry standards when it comes to responding with data rather than responding to a browser

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You want to use from_json which does the opposite of to_json. This will take the object being sent in JSON and convert it into ruby so your model or however you save it will understand.

@post = Post.new
@post.name = "Hello"

#this converts the object to JSON
@post.to_json 

@post = You want to use `from_json` which does the opposite of `to_json`. This will take the object being sent in JSON and convert it into ruby so your model or however you save it will understand.


@post = Post.new
@post.name = "Hello"

#this converts the object to JSON
@post.to_json 

@post = {
     "name" => 'Hello'
   }   

#this puts it back into JSON
@post.from_json

@post.name = "Hello"
@post.to_json

In terms of sending JSON (server side) to a controller that is usually done from JavaScript or AS3.

You should explain how you are posting. From a form, from a link. That matters; however, the easiest way is to use jQuery.

$.ajax({
    type: 'POST',
    url: url,
    data: data,
    success: success,
    dataType: json
});

Here you want the url to be the post url such has app.com/posts (your domain, and then a controller) and then the data should be in JSON format, for example:

data = {
         "name" => 'Hello'
       }
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JSON is usually send from JavaScript. See the code for example. –  Dark Passenger Jul 11 '11 at 11:30
    
Ok, I think I get your above code. But are you saying that It 'should not' or cannot be sent using ruby or rails. Sorry for not defining how I'm posting. To be honest I'm not really sure. There is no form at the moment and In my mind it was simple enough that I could hard code a json and send it to the other application. I did read that a form is required for rest post's in HTML but up until now I've just been using the NET:HTTP code and its worked nicely. The receiving web app has no issues taking this in as in quesiton 2. –  OVERTONE Jul 11 '11 at 11:46
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