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I want to run some c++ code on Linux and Windows. There are some pieces of code that I want to include only for one operating system and not the other. Is there a standard #ifdef that once can use?

Something like:

  #ifdef LINUX_KEY_WORD
    ... // linux code goes here.
  #elif WINDOWS_KEY_WORD
    ... // windows code goes here.
  #else 
  #error "OS not supported!"
  #endif
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You could look this up in the soruce of a multi-platform open-source project. –  Karoly Horvath Jul 11 '11 at 12:20
    
Keep in mind that you want different flags when deciding which compiler is running than you do for deciding the target OS. They're completely unrelated. Question implies you're deciding the target OS, can you confirm that? –  Mooing Duck Dec 20 '12 at 17:49
1  
@MooingDuck: I confirm that I wanted to decided on the target OS not necessarily on the compiler used. –  Sardathrion Dec 21 '12 at 8:34
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8 Answers

up vote 68 down vote accepted

The only correct answer is this glorious website: http://sourceforge.net/p/predef/wiki/OperatingSystems/

The predef macro magic is now part of boost (since v1.55.0).

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+1 Terse, utterly informative, and complete. Well done sir. –  Sardathrion Jul 11 '11 at 12:48
    
I'm not so sure. It lists linux as the macro for linux but the preferred forms are clearly __linux__ or sometimes __linux. There are actually kernel patches to remove checking for linux. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jul 11 '11 at 16:40
2  
@edA-qa: I posted an outdated link, updated to the new wiki-ized version of the same project. –  rubenvb Jul 11 '11 at 17:02
    
That looks better. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jul 11 '11 at 17:08
1  
@Joakim thanks, updated –  rubenvb Dec 20 '12 at 17:30
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use:

#ifdef __linux__ 
    //linux code goes here
#elif _WIN32
    // windows code goes here
#else

#endif
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1  
It's __linux or linux, not __linux__ –  rubenvb Jul 11 '11 at 12:25
3  
@rubenvb __linux__ works too. –  Park Young-Bae Jul 11 '11 at 12:30
    
@Cicada: so it does. Shame on me for using the outdated version of a website... –  rubenvb Jul 12 '11 at 9:22
1  
this answer is sort of better in that it directly answers the question, instead of just providing a link to some 3rd site which may die one day –  Petr Mar 6 at 8:32
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This response isn't about macro war, but producing error if no matching platform is found.

#ifdef LINUX_KEY_WORD   
... // linux code goes here.  
#elif WINDOWS_KEY_WORD    
... // windows code goes here.  
#else     
#error Platform not supported
#endif

If #error is not supported, you may use static_assert (C++0x) keyword. Or you may implement custom STATIC_ASSERT, or just declare an array of size 0, or have switch that has duplicate cases. In short, produce error at compile time and not at runtime

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Thank you. The code in the question has been modified. –  Sardathrion Apr 1 at 9:01
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It depends on the used compiler.

For example, Windows' definition can be WIN32 or _WIN32.

And Linux' definition can be UNIX or __unix__ or LINUX or __linux__.

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There is such a standard. Those toolchains that don't adhere to it, are either buggy, stone-age old, or just bad. –  rubenvb Jul 11 '11 at 12:24
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It depends on the compiler. If you compile with, say, G++ on Linux and VC++ on Windows, this will do :

#ifdef linux
    ...
#elif _WIN32
    ...
#else
    ...
#endif
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This will always do. All compilers implement this in the same fashion. Clang on linux mimicks GCC, Clang and GCC on Windows mimicks MSVC. –  rubenvb Jul 11 '11 at 12:26
3  
@rubenvb: All existing compilers, by convenience. This behavior is not standardized and may as well be different for some compilers nobody uses. –  Park Young-Bae Jul 11 '11 at 12:29
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You can do

#if MACRO0
    //code...
#elif MACRO1
    //code...
#endif

Where Macro can be:

    __linux__       Defined on Linux
    __sun           Defined on Solaris
    __FreeBSD__     Defined on FreeBSD
    __NetBSD__      Defined on NetBSD
    __OpenBSD__     Defined on OpenBSD
    __APPLE__       Defined on Mac OS X
    __hpux          Defined on HP-UX
    __osf__         Defined on Tru64 UNIX (formerly DEC OSF1)
    __sgi           Defined on Irix
    _AIX            Defined on AIX
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1  
LOL why is _WIN32 for Windows missing? :-) –  jamadagni May 29 at 2:37
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No, these defines are compiler dependent. What you can do, use your own set of defines, and set them on the Makefile. See this thread for more info.

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6  
correct, but not helpful –  duedl0r Jul 11 '11 at 12:26
    
@Cicada: Compiler dependent has no meaning when all compilers (worth talking about) do the same thing. –  rubenvb Jul 11 '11 at 12:26
    
yet, there's no standard defining this, and that's what he asked for. I'm updating the answer to point it to an useful reference about this –  Vitor Jul 11 '11 at 13:14
1  
I'm amused that you suggest makefiles as an alternative to "compiler dependent" defines. More compilers use the same defines than use makefiles. –  Mooing Duck Dec 20 '12 at 17:53
2  
Compilers don't use makefiles, makefiles use compilers. –  patrickvacek Sep 13 '13 at 15:12
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