Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Garbage collection involves walking through a list of allocated objects (either all objects or objects in a particular generation) and determining which are reachable.

  1. How is this list maintained? Do runtimes for GC languages keep a giant list of all objects?

  2. Also, from what I understand, GC involves walking the call stack to look for object references - how does the algorithm distinguish between GC-able pointers and primitive data?

share|improve this question
1  
there are different GC strategies, it's better to just read a wiki page about garbage collection: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garbage_collection_(computer_science) –  keymone Jul 11 '11 at 13:27
    
@keymone For the love of God don't read the Wikipedia page about garbage collection. It is full of misinformation. Read Richard Jones' book instead: gchandbook.org –  Jon Harrop Jun 19 '12 at 15:20
    
@JonHarrop i referred to wiki just because it usually provides high-level overview on most topics. thanks for the link. –  keymone Jun 19 '12 at 16:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. The memory management system keeps track of the size of each allocated object, just like it does in C or C++. One way this is commonly done is for the memory management system to allocate an extra size_t before each allocation, that keeps track of the size of each objecct. The memory manager likewise has to keep track of the size of each free block, so that it can reuse blocks to allocate them.

    The garbage collector works in two phases: the mark phase, and the sweep phase. In the mark phase, the garbage collector starts walks object references in order to find objects that are still reachable. The garbage collector starts at a few basic places where the object references are stored and given names (the stack, and global storage, and static storage), and then traverses references in the objects.

    In the sweep phase, the garbage collector walks the heap from bottom to top, jumping from allocation to allocation based on those size_ts, and frees anything that isn't marked.

  2. Some languages (like Ruby) tag all of the primitives so that they can be identified separately from the object references at runtime. Other garbage collectors are ver conservative and follow primatives as through they were object references (though some checks must be performed to make sure that the garbage collector doesn't stick a mark in the middle of some other object). Still other languages use runtime type information to be more precise about whether they follow primatives.


Ruby's garbage collector sometimes called "conservative" because it doesn't check whether the space on the stack is actually being used, so it sometimes keeps dead objects alive by following ghost references on the stack. But since it always knows exactly whether the data it's looking at is a reference or a primative, I don't call it conservative here.

share|improve this answer

This site ( How Java’s Garbage Collector Works? ) has a good, brief explanation on how garbage collectors work, not just the default Java one.

share|improve this answer

Garbage collection involves walking through a list of allocated objects (either all objects or objects in a particular generation) and determining which are reachable.

Not really. GCs are categorized into tracing and reference counting (see A unified theory of garbage collection). Tracing GCs start from a set of global roots and trace all objects reachable from them. Reference counting GCs count the number of references to each object and reclaim it when the count reaches zero. Neither require a list including unreachable objects.

How is this list maintained? Do runtimes for GC languages keep a giant list of all objects?

Pedagogical solutions like the one in HLVM can keep a list of all objects because it is simple but this is rare.

Also, from what I understand, GC involves walking the call stack to look for object references - how does the algorithm distinguish between GC-able pointers and primitive data?

Again, there are many different strategies. Conservative GCs are unable to distinguish between pointers and non-pointers so they conservatively consider that non-pointers might be pointers. Pedagogical GCs like the one in HLVM can use algorithms like Henderson's Accurate GC in an uncooperative environment. Production GCs store enough information in the OS thread stack to determine exactly which words are pointers (and which stack frames to skip because they are not affiliated with managed code) and then use a stack walker to find them.

Note that you also have to find local references held in registers as well as on the stack.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.