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This is the kind of thing I feel I should already know, but don't...

In MS Access, if a query consists of n calculated fields (say calc_1, calc_2, .... calc_n) but I only want to use a subset of them in a particular form or report - say calc_x, calc_y and calc_z - would Access calculate all n calculations when running SELECT calc_x, calc_y, calc_z FROM myquery and then return the ones I want, or would it be smart enough to only calculate calc_x, calc_y and calc_z?

In my case I'm using Access 2003 but presumably the answer is the same for all versions.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Access is smart and don't calculate not-visible fields. Tried with Access 2003

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Er, what? If you include the calculated fields in the SELECT clause of your report or form's recordsource, it will calculate them. If you leave them out of the SELECT and include the calculations only in the ControlSource properties of controls on your report/form, then what you say is true. But for the question asked, the answer is WRONG (because the question explicitly puts the calculations in the SELECT clause). –  David-W-Fenton Jul 13 '11 at 19:36
1  
@David: My thoughts exactly. So I tested it for myself. Seems @Andreas is correct. I included my testing methodology as a separate answer. Let me know if you see a problem with any of my assumptions. –  mwolfe02 Jul 13 '11 at 19:57

Like @David, I did not believe @Andreas's answer at first. So I tested it myself as follows. I created the following function:

Function Watch(Val, Optional CalledFrom As String = "")
    Debug.Print Val, CalledFrom
    Watch = Val
End Function

Then I created a table named "Dummy" with a single field named "ID". I created a form and used the following as the form's RecordSource:

SELECT Watch([ID],"ShowInForm") AS ShowInForm, 
       Watch([ID],"HideFromForm") AS HideFromForm 
FROM Dummy;

I added a single textbox control with a ControlSource of ShowInForm.

I then opened the form and got this in the immediate window:

 1            ShowInForm
 1            ShowInForm
 1            ShowInForm

I then went back to the RecordSource and previewed it in Datasheet view and got this:

 1            ShowInForm
 1            HideFromForm

I'm not sure why the "ShowInForm" expression is evaluated three times in the form, but it seems pretty clear that the unused field, "HideFromForm", does not get evaluated.


To address @HansUp's comment, I went back and saved a query named "Qry":

SELECT Watch([ID],"ShowInForm") AS ShowInForm, 
       Watch([ID],"HideFromForm") AS HideFromForm
FROM Dummy;

Then changed the form RecordSource to:

Select ShowInForm FROM Qry

This produced the same result as before when I opened the form (ie, 3 lines of 1 ShowInForm). Interestingly, when I opened the RecordSource in datasheet view I got this:

 1            ShowInForm
 1            ShowInForm

In other words, it evaluated the ShowInForm field twice. Presumably, once in "Qry" and again in the RecordSource query.

The end result is still a confirmation of @Andreas's answer.

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+1 For ingenuity. However I'm not sure it directly address the question @Waggers asked. He has a query named "myquery" which included a bunch of calculated fields. This his form or report record source is another query, based on myquery, which returns a subset of the myquery fields. (SELECT calc_x, calc_y, calc_z FROM myquery) So, the question, as I understood it, was will the database engine calculate those myquery fields which are not included in the record source query's field list. –  HansUp Jul 13 '11 at 20:26
    
I don't understand how this can be so. What happens if you then have VBA code that tries to reference the value returned by the non-displayed field? I guess that might explain the problem introduced in A2000 where fields in a form's Recordsource cannot be referred to reliably unless they also serve as the ControlSource of a control on the form/report. –  David-W-Fenton Jul 15 '11 at 19:04
    
Also, I'm not sure what one can do with this information. I wouldn't count on this by engineering my SELECT statements to have a bunch of unnecessary calculations in them, for instance. Secondly, though, what purpose is served in having a calculation that you can't do anything with? That is, if it's not used as a ControlSource in the form/report, then you won't have any access to the value returned by the calculation, so what's the purpose in having it there? –  David-W-Fenton Jul 15 '11 at 19:07

If you include the calculated fields in the SELECT clause of your report or form's recordsource, it will calculate them for each row AS IT IS RETRIEVED.

If you leave them out of the SELECT and include the calculations only in the ControlSource properties of controls on your report/form, then what you say is true.

Also, if you do any sorting/grouping on the calculations or put criteria on them, all rows will be calculated.

Thus, in this recordsource:

  SELECT Field1/Field2 As Ratio1, Field3/Field4 As Ratio2, FIeld1, Field2, Field3, Field4
  FROM MyTable;

...for each row that is retrieved, both calculations will be executed regardless of whether or not the result is used in the form or report.

If you want to delay calculations to the last possible moment, do NOT include them in the SQL recordsource, but just use them as the ControlSources of the controls that are displaying the calculations. However, this has the downside that you'll see the calculations painting onscreen in many cases.

EDIT:

It seems this may not be correct, but I feel there's something going on here that is not completely explained by @mwolfe02's answer. I'll just leave this here for further discussion.

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I put calculations like this on the server side.. computed columns are awesome.

I think that Access finally got this feature in 2007, I don't know how people ever survived without it.

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