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I'm new to Python, I still have issues with the semantics of class inheritance.

The following is the relevant class from the module games.py module that I am importing:

class Text(Sprite): 
    """ 
    Alphanumeric values displayed on the screen.
    """      
    def __init__(self, value, size, color, angle=0, 
                 x=0, y=0,
                 top=None, bottom=None, left=None, right=None,
                 dx=0, dy=0,
                 interval=1, is_collideable=True):
        self._size = size 
        self._color = color 
        self._value = value
        self._font = pygame.font.Font(None, self._size)
        Sprite.__init__(self, self._create_surface(), angle,
                        x, y,
                        top, bottom, left, right,
                        dx, dy,
                        interval, is_collideable)

and the following is from where I'm trying to call it in my own program:

self.scorebox = games.Text (value = self.scorevar,
                            pygame.font.Font(ardarlingopentype, 50),
                            color = color.white,
                            x = 550,
                            y = 50)

As you can see the syntax is wrong, but how do I go about fixing this such that I can inherit the class Text from my own program and make FONT an accessible argument that I can change?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I notice your second argument is not a named argument. Unnamed arguments cannot follow named arguments. –  Steven Rumbalski Jul 11 '11 at 15:13
1  
Instead of using Sprite.__init__(self, ...), use super(Text, self).__init__(...). –  Chris Morgan Jul 11 '11 at 15:22
2  
At first, I'd not recommend to use super() it does not seem to be the problem of the OP, it can be pretty complicated, there is no diamod inheritance in the problem and the Sprite class does not use super() itself. I may not get something, however. Why should he use super()? –  brandizzi Jul 11 '11 at 17:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure(note that you can't used not named arguments after named and/or mix them - you have used not named argument after 'value') but seems that you need to modify code the following way:

class Text(Sprite): 
    """ 
    Alphanumeric values displayed on the screen.
    """      
    def __init__(self, value, size, color, angle=0, 
                 x=0, y=0,
                 top=None, bottom=None, left=None, right=None, font=None,
                 dx=0, dy=0,
                 interval=1, is_collideable=True):
        self._size = size 
        self._color = color 
        self._value = value
        if font:
            self.font_ = font
        else:
            self._font = pygame.font.Font(None, self._size)
        Sprite.__init__(self, self._create_surface(), angle,
                        x, y,
                        top, bottom, left, right,
                        dx, dy,
                        interval, is_collideable)

And then:

import pygame
import games

self.scorebox = games.Text (value = self.scorevar,
                            size = 50,
                            color = color.white,
                            x = 550,
                            y = 50)

OR:

import pygame
import games

self.scorebox = games.Text (value = self.scorevar,
                            size = 50, 
                            font = pygame.font.Font(ardarlingopentype, 50),
                            color = color.white,
                            x = 550,
                            y = 50)
share|improve this answer

Your problem is, that you you are ordering the arguments incorrectly: there are positional and keyword arguments. All keywords arguments must succeed the positional arguments.

This would work:

self.scorebox = games.Text (
                        pygame.font.Font(ardarlingopentype, 50),
                        value = self.scorevar,
                        color = color.white,
                        x = 550,
                        y = 50
)
share|improve this answer
    
Tried this, still did not work. Thanks though. –  Louis93 Jul 11 '11 at 15:38
    
@Louis93: Can you define "didn't work" ? Syntactically, this should be correct. –  phant0m Jul 11 '11 at 15:41
    
I'll print out the errors, just a second. –  Louis93 Jul 11 '11 at 16:43
    
@Louis93: waiting... :) –  phant0m Jul 11 '11 at 16:59
    
Sorry! I received a response from the developers of the Livewires package. Look at the answer right below! I'm sorry should've posted earlier. thank you though. –  Louis93 Jul 12 '11 at 0:52

So guys I wrote to the developers of the Livewires package; and I was fortunate enough to receive a reply from one of them.

First, make a backup copy of games.py and put it somewhere safe. That way if you do make a mistake, you can always recover the original code.

Now our games.py is written on top of the PyGame library, which does provide a way of setting the font. As you might have guessed, it's to do with that line reading:

> self._font = pygame.font.Font(None, self._size)

The documentation is available online at http://www.pygame.org/docs/ref/font.html#pygame.font.Font but I'll just quickly summarise here. pygame.font.Font() creates a new PyGame font object, which PyGame uses to tell it how to draw text. The "None" parameter tells it to use the default font, but you can replace that with the full name of a font file instead. The easiest way to do that is to modify the Text classes initialiser to pass it as an optional parameter.

class Text(Sprite):

                  def __init__(self, value, size, color, angle=0,
>                               x=0, y=0,
>                               top=None, bottom=None, left=None, right=None,
>                               dx=0, dy=0,
>                               interval=1, is_collideable=True,
>                               fontfile=None):
>        self._size = size
>        self._color = color
>        self._value = value
>        self._font = pygame.font.Font(fontfile, self._size)
>        Sprite.__init__(self, self._create_surface(), angle,
>                        x, y,
>                        top, bottom, left, right,
>                        dx, dy,
>                        interval, is_collideable)

You would then create your Text object by calling 'Text(blah blah blah, fontfile="/some/font/file/name.ttf")' or whatever the filename is. Any other Text objects that don't specify a "fontfile" will automatically use "None" instead, which will give them the default font exactly as before.

So what's the fully-qualified pathname of the font file for "TimesNewRoman"? I have no idea what it would be on your computer. Fortunately PyGame provides a way of not having to know: pygame.font.match_font(). You can use that in your own program (rather than modifying games.py any more), but you will have to either "import pygame.font" for yourself or call it "games.pygame.font.match_font()" -- either should work equally well.

share|improve this answer
1  
Does this solve your problem? "First, make a backup copy of games.py and put it somewhere safe. That way if you do make a mistake, you can always recover the original code." You should rather use something like Git or Mercurial. –  phant0m Jul 12 '11 at 1:01
    
And yes, it did solve my problem. And thank you, I will. –  Louis93 Jul 12 '11 at 14:20

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