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Are there any circumstances where identically named classes and functions in PHP, could collide or cause problems in any way? For example:

function Foobar(){
    // ...
}

class Foobar{
    // ...
}

Cursory testing shows that PHP can discern between them based on context.

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aren't functions usually named after what they do and classes are usually named after things/concepts? –  Gordon Jul 11 '11 at 15:35
    
@Gordon - Of course, I just wanted to provide a pseudo static __invoke. –  Dan Lugg Jul 11 '11 at 15:40
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, they never collide. But:

Do not do it.

You will confuse everyone if you do so, because I would not expect there to be a function and a class of the same name. Many don't even know it's legal to do so.

When I see an upper case name In PHP (first letter), I assume it is a class. If you put () around it, I will know it's a function. But I wouldn't assume that there is a class of the same name. All you do is confuse people. Some might assume: "Cool, I didn't know you could omit new". I don't know what your intents are, but if it's to get rid of the new keyword - and only that - it's very bad. I will assume you do more than just that, and will go check what that function actually does, and I'll get angry if I find out it does nothing except returning a new instance without doing anything... I just wasted my time looking up a function that does... nothing.

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Thanks @phant0m - Care to elaborate? –  Dan Lugg Jul 11 '11 at 15:31
    
regarding edit; Understandably so; my intent was to provide a sort of static version of __invoke(), to maintain brevity in view generation, where less is more; and not always to skip new –  Dan Lugg Jul 11 '11 at 15:34
    
What would that function do? –  phant0m Jul 11 '11 at 15:35
    
While it does return an instance of the identically named object, it creates a sort of object collection with it. Rather than create a static method in the class, I figured to reduce coupling I could benefit from such a function, because there are still circumstances under which I would want to create new objects from that class. I could just as easily name the function getNew___() but I figured the association between identical names would be seemingly implicit, not so much confusing. –  Dan Lugg Jul 11 '11 at 15:38
1  
Making opinions bold or fat headlines doesn't make them more valid. - And the confusion part here is most assuredly constrained to newcomers. Factory methods don't require the stale 08/15 scheme just to be understandable; that's flimsy. –  mario Jul 11 '11 at 15:46

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