Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the most portable and robust way to get the list of paths, configured by /etc/ld.so.conf and files included from it? Parsing the file manually seems to be not a good idea — the format is likely to change in the future revisions.


To allow better understanding of the question, I will give you specific details below. Note that, despite these details, this is a general programming question, applicable to other situations.

There is a program, called LuaRocks. It is a package manager for Lua programming language (somewhat like Ruby gems or Python eggs). LuaRocks packages are called "rocks".

As a convenience feature, LuaRocks allows a rock author to specify a list of external dependencies for a rock, formulated as a list of C header files and / or dynamic library files. (.so on Linux.) If the specified file does not exist, the rock can't be installed.

Currently, on Linux, LuaRocks by default checks .so file existance by searching for the file in two hardcoded paths, /usr/lib and /usr/local/lib.

I believe that this is incorrect behaviour, and it is broken by the recent changes in the Ubuntu and other Debian distributions.

Update: the paths are not hardcoded per se, but are user-configurable in the config file. Still, IMO, not a best solution.

Instead (as I understand it), LuaRocks should look up file in the paths, specified by /etc/ld.so.conf and files included from it.

(Now please re-read the question above ;-) )

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You shouldn't need to parse /etc/ld.so.conf or any of the config files - if you run 'ldconfig', it will scan the configured directories and generate a cache file.

Then, subsequently when you attempt a dlopen it'll automatically find the files by iterating through the cached library directories. Same thing with compiling and giving -lSomeLib, you shouldn't need to specify -L/my/other/path if you've got it configured in ld.so.conf(.d)

autoconf accomplishes this by attempting to compile a test program that links to the shared library, but that's just a functional wrapper around the dlopen() call.

So, while other methods may not necessarily be 'wrong', at the root of it attempting to link to the library or doing a dlopen() are the 'most right' ways of doing it.

Consider this, if you attempt to link to a library in a directory that ISN'T cached in /etc/ld.so.cache, when you try to run the program it will fail because it won't be able to dlopen() the library!

Hence, any 'good' shared library will be in /etc/ld.so.cache and be linkable/dlopen()able, this means that gcc can use it to link and that the user-generated library or executable will be able to open it when it executes.

You can circumvent this by expressly setting the environment variable LD_LIBRARY_PATH, or LD_PRELOAD_PATH - but each of these has it's own caveats and should be avoided if possible for 'standard' use.

A good write-up on writing shared libraries covers some of these issues, and is a good read for anyone working on programmatic consuming of other-shared libraries. Ulrich Drepper's How to write shared libraries.

share|improve this answer
    
The question is not related to dlopen: LR must decide if the system conforms to the contract of the rock before the rock (and the library) is installed. –  Alexander Gladysh Jul 11 '11 at 18:30
    
Actually, it is since dlopen() is how the operating system finds dynamic libraries. The issues are intertwined. That is to say, if you run ldconfig, you don't need to 'search' for libraries - they'll be found automatically. But. Thanks for the down-vote anyway! –  synthesizerpatel Jul 11 '11 at 18:34
    
Well, it is related, OK, but the point is that LR must make a decision long before it would be able to call dlopen() or ldd on the file in question (the file may even not exist at this point — it is yet to be built). –  Alexander Gladysh Jul 11 '11 at 18:38
    
You missed the point - you add directories to files in /etc/ld.so.conf.d/, then you run ldconfig, ldconfig generates /etc/ld.so.cache, then anything that is trying to find a shared library 'gcc foo.c -lMyLib', or 'ld -shared foo.c -lMyLib', or 'dlopen('MyLib')' reference the cache @ /etc/ld.so.cache, you don't need to specify the directories. This is specifically why when you install new shared libraries autoconf will emit a message saying 'You should rerun ldconfig to update your cache'. At that point you shouldn't have to provide any hints to make/compile tools. –  synthesizerpatel Jul 11 '11 at 18:41
2  
autoconf accomplishes this by attempting to compile a test program that links to the shared library, but that's just a functional wrapper around the dlopen() call. So, while other methods may not necessarily be 'wrong', at the root of it attempting to link to the library or doing a dlopen() are the 'most right' ways of doing it. Consider this, if you attempt to link to a library that ISN'T cached in /etc/ld.so.cache, when you try to run the program it will fail because it won't be able to dlopen() the library! Hence, any 'good' library will be in /etc/ld.so.cache and be linkable/dlopen()able. –  synthesizerpatel Jul 11 '11 at 19:19

According to the FHS, the following are valid locations for dynamic libraries:

/lib*/
/opt/*/lib*/
/usr/lib*/
/usr/local/lib*/

(And most likely ~/lib*/ as well.)

All entries in my /etc/ld.so.conf.d/* conform to this. Some entries reference subdirectories below the FHS dirs, which probably means that you can use the libraries in there without path information.

Now I don't know enough about LuaRocks. If you're limited to Lua-path-style globs (only ?), you cannot match these and have to parse the configs. Otherwise, you could just try to find them anywhere in these directories.

This would break on non-FHS-conforming systems (only option: parse config) and if a directory is not included in the config, the installer might see libraries that the linker cannot find.

These two seem acceptable to me, therefore I'd simply ignore the config and look at these dirs.

(Another possibility could be trying to link the library, this should automagically use the right path. However, this is platform-specific and maybe dangerous.)

share|improve this answer
    
Lua-path-style-globs are irrelevant here (and we're talking about code change in LR, so thats not a problem anyway). –  Alexander Gladysh Jul 11 '11 at 18:31
    
Direct lookup in directories looks not robust enough — admin user may reconfigure the system differently anyway. –  Alexander Gladysh Jul 11 '11 at 18:31
    
Parsing the config manually is discussed in the question. –  Alexander Gladysh Jul 11 '11 at 18:32
    
Linking the library (or invoking ldd on it) is not acceptable for performance and sanity reasons. –  Alexander Gladysh Jul 11 '11 at 18:32
1  
@Alexander: The alternate format lib directories are written as lib<qual> over there, you can find them from the ToC. <qual> could be anything, therefore *. –  nobody Jul 13 '11 at 3:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.