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Is there a way, either textual or graphical, to view the hierarchy of dependencies between nuget packages?

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4 Answers 4

Package Visualized from NuGet 1.4 should work. See http://docs.nuget.org/docs/release-notes/nuget-1.4

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Ahh that is helpful, but unfortunately I only have VS Pro, and the tools used for that are only in Ultimate. :( –  Neil Barnwell Jul 11 '11 at 17:14
    
Its unfortunate that is not included in pro version. IMHO considering NuGet is available even in express versions, all its features should be available even in express versions. Package graph information is very helpful sometime. –  Leadfoot May 13 '14 at 12:27

It is also possible to write code against the API in NuGet.Core. Install it via nuget:

install-package nuget.core

Then you can get a repository object and walk the graph. Here's a sample app I just built:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using NuGet;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {    
            var repo = new LocalPackageRepository(@"C:\Code\Common\Group\Business-Logic\packages");
            IQueryable<IPackage> packages = repo.GetPackages();
            OutputGraph(repo, packages, 0);
        }

        static void OutputGraph(LocalPackageRepository repository, IEnumerable<IPackage> packages, int depth)
        {
            foreach (IPackage package in packages)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0}{1} v{2}", new string(' ', depth), package.Id, package.Version);

                IList<IPackage> dependentPackages = new List<IPackage>();
                foreach (var dependency in package.Dependencies)
                {
                    dependentPackages.Add(repository.FindPackage(dependency.Id, dependency.VersionSpec.ToString()));
                }

                OutputGraph(repository, dependentPackages, depth += 3);
            }
        }
    }
}

In my case this app outputs something like this:

MyCompany.Castle v1.1.0.3
   Castle.Windsor v2.5.3
      Castle.Core v2.5.2
      MyCompany.Common v1.1.0.6
         CommonServiceLocator v1.0
            MyCompany.Enum v1.1.0.7
   MyCompany.Common v1.1.0.6
      CommonServiceLocator v1.0
         MyCompany.Enum v1.1.0.7
      MyCompany.Enum v1.1.0.7
         MyCompany.Versioning v1.3
            Castle.Core v2.5.2
               Castle.Windsor v2.5.3
                  Castle.Core v2.5.2
                  CommonServiceLocator v1.0
                     NUnit v2.5.10.11092
                        RhinoMocks v3.6
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1  
There's a ResolveDependency extension method in NuGet that you can use. –  davidfowl Jul 19 '11 at 9:17
1  
depth += 3 is probably a bug, change to depth + 3. You can then see all packages on the left and only dependencies of that packages are indented –  WhiteKnight Sep 26 '13 at 16:59
    
I tried to update this to the latest version of NuGet, but my edit was rejected. Change foreach dependency to package.DependencySets and add another foreach loop get the dependency. –  WhiteKnight Sep 26 '13 at 17:08

Like @neil-barnwell solution, but works with NuGet.Core 2.7+

Install-Package NuGet.Core

Here is the code

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Runtime.Versioning;
using NuGet;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var frameworkName = new FrameworkName(".NETFramework, Version=4.0");

        // var packageSource = "https://www.nuget.org/api/v2/";
        var packageSource = Path.Combine(Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("LocalAppData"), "NuGet", "Cache");

        var repository = PackageRepositoryFactory.Default.CreateRepository(packageSource);
        const bool prerelease = false;

        var packages = repository.GetPackages()
            .Where(p => prerelease ? p.IsAbsoluteLatestVersion : p.IsLatestVersion)
            .Where(p => VersionUtility.IsCompatible(frameworkName, p.GetSupportedFrameworks()));

        foreach (IPackage package in packages)
        {
            GetValue(repository, frameworkName, package, prerelease, 0);
        }

        Console.WriteLine();
        Console.WriteLine("Press Enter...");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    private static void GetValue(IPackageRepository repository, FrameworkName frameworkName, IPackage package, bool prerelease, int level)
    {

        Console.WriteLine("{0}{1}", new string(' ', level * 3), package);
        foreach (PackageDependency dependency in package.GetCompatiblePackageDependencies(frameworkName))
        {
            IPackage subPackage = repository.ResolveDependency(dependency, prerelease, true);
            GetValue(repository, frameworkName, subPackage, prerelease, level + 1);
        }
    }
}
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I fixed a tiny code error that messes up the indentation. –  Erno de Weerd Jul 8 '14 at 11:52

FYI, MyGet.org has this kind of visualization built-in. You can view dependency graphs on the Feed Details page.

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