Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Problem: I find myself often wanting to handle an event on a collection of objects. As objects are added and removed from the collection, each object must be hooked or unhooked. I find this to be tedious and repetetive to design each class that does this with the same event hooking code.

Desired Solution: So, I'm trying to come up with something like an EventBindingList, which contains hookable objects, and allows the user to hook multiple objects at once, and to add and remove objects in the list.

In order to keep it generic, it is necessary to use Reflection. In the constructor of the list, the user can specify by EventInfo or by Event name what event is being hooked. This seemed like the simplest way.

    private EventInfo _info;

    public EventBindingList(string EventName)
    {
        _info = typeof(T).GetEvents().Where(e => e.Name == EventName).First();
    }

    public EventBindingList(EventInfo info)
    {
        _info = info;
    }

I've tried a couple of approaches, but I continue to have problems with the differences between methods, delegates, lambdas, and EventHandlers.

Failed Solution 1:

One solution I tried which did not work was to use a custom event accessor. This would be an event on the list containing the objects to be hooked. This is because, when adding an EventHandler, an ArgumentException is thrown: Object of type 'System.EventHandler' cannot be converted to type 'ExternalProject.CustomEventHandler'. I tried casting the EventHandler to the correct type (using generic type arguments, since this is an external project's event handler), but the cast would fail.

    public event EventHandler ElementEvent
    {
        add
        {
            _handlers.Add(value);
            foreach (T t in this)
            {
                _info.AddEventHandler(t, value);
            }
        }
        remove
        {
            foreach (T t in this)
            {
                _info.RemoveEventHandler(t, value);
            }
            _handlers.Remove(value);
        }
    }

Failed Solution 2:

I have not found a good way to have the list itself handle the event, and then call a delegate for any subscribers. I discovered that attempting to use reflection to add an event handler requires a delegate. In my tests, I could find no way to preserve the parameters of the event, and pass those along to the subscriber as well.

Request: Are there any other ideas for how this may be accomplished?

share|improve this question
2  
What's wrong with ObservableCollection<T>. It has events that let you subscribe when things are added/replaced and unsubscribe when items are replaced/removed. –  agent-j Jul 11 '11 at 17:07
    
@agent-j +1, the OP may not be aware of that one even though it might be obvious to others. You should add that as answer :) –  jlafay Jul 11 '11 at 17:13
    
@agent-j That is indeed a collection type that I was not aware of. While I do think it may help with monitoring the changes in the list of objects, I do not immediately see how it can help with genericly hooking events, which is the main problem I am having. I actually was considering to derive from BindingList<T> for this implementation, but I may now check ObservableCollection<T> instead. –  Nathan Jul 11 '11 at 17:28
    
@jlafay, @Nathan, I've posted a suggestion. The OnItemAdded would of course be used to hookup new items... –  agent-j Jul 11 '11 at 17:34

2 Answers 2

Edit:

public abstract class ManagedEventCollection<T,TEventArgs> : IList<T>
{
   private EventInfo m_event;
   public ManagedEventCollection(string eventName)
   {
      m_list = new ObservableCollection<T> ();
      m_list.CollectionChanged += CollectionChanged;
      m_event = typeof (T).GetEvent (eventName);
   }
   // Add/Remove/Indexer/Clear methods alter contents of m_list.

   public EventHandler<TEventArgs> Handler{get;set;}

   protected abstract void OnItemAdded(T item);
   protected abstract void OnItemRemoved(T item);

   private void CollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs ea)
   {
      foreach (T item in ea.NewItems)
      {
         m_event.AddEventHandler (
            item, 
            Delegate.CreateDelegate (m_event.EventHandlerType, item, Handler.Method));
      }
      foreach (T item in ea.OldItems)
      {
         m_event.RemoveEventHandler (
            item, 
            Delegate.CreateDelegate (m_event.EventHandlerType, item, Handler.Method));
      }
   }
}

Original Answer: You can use ObservableCollection<T>. This class has a CollectionChanged event in which you can subscribe/unsubscribe events as necessary.

I would create a base class (this is from memory, just to get the point accross).

public abstract class ManagedEventCollection<T> : IList<T>
{
   public ManagedEventCollection()
   {
      m_list = new ObservableCollection<T> ();
      m_list.CollectionChanged += CollectionChanged;
   }
   ... // Add/Remove/Indexer/Clear methods alter contents of m_list.
   protected abstract void OnItemAdded(T item);
   protected abstract void OnItemRemoved(T item);

   private ObservableCollection<T> m_list;
   private void CollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs ea)
   {
      foreach (T item in ea.NewItems)
         OnItemAdded(item);
      foreach (T item in ea.OldItems)
         OnItemRemoved(item);
   }
}

Then, your derived type can do this:

public class DogManagedEventCollection : ManagedEventCollection<Dog>
{
   protected override OnItemAdded (Dog dog)
   {
      dog.Bark += Bark;
   }
   protected override OnItemRemoved (Dog dog)
   {
      dog.Bark -= Bark;
   }

   private void Bark(object sender, BarkEventArgs ea){...}
}

You could also subscribe with reflection if you really wanted, to, but that will be more error-prone and not as easy to read/maintain/understand.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is helpful. While it's still putting the user in charge of hooking, rather than the list, it is a step up from the copy/pasted add/remove code I was using. –  Nathan Jul 11 '11 at 17:37
    
Technically, my solution doesn't even require the ObservableCollection (any list would do because you would have your own Add/Remove/indexer[]/Clear methods), but you could extend Observable collection if you wanted to. –  agent-j Jul 11 '11 at 17:37
    
Yes, extending the ObservableCollection would allow me access to those methods, but I was in fact previously using a BindingList to do the same thing. In either solution, there is much more burden on the user than a simple ObjectsList.Event += EventHandler, which would be awesome, imo. Having the user extend the observable collection for each case in which they need to hook many events seems much more cumbersome, and is only translating the problem I described above. (But like I said, this translation is still an improvement! Thanks!) –  Nathan Jul 11 '11 at 17:47
    
What about defining the ManagedEventCollection with a second generic type argument: TEventArgs. This way, you can set the EventHandler<TEventArgs> CustomEventHandler property and use it as is (without casting). –  agent-j Jul 11 '11 at 20:12
    
This seems similar to the suggestion provided by InBetween. It's nice, but it only works for EventHandlers that are derived from EventHandler<TEventArgs>. This is fine for most user-defined events, but many framework events don't use EventHandler<TEventArgs>. –  Nathan Jul 11 '11 at 21:06

Haven't tested it as I can't at the moment so carry on with caution :).

Wouldn't something like this work if for some reason ObservableCollection is not what you were looking for (which, by the way, I think is a much better and cleaner solution than mine)?

public class MyEventList<TElementType,TEventArgType>: IList<TElementType> where TEventArgType: EventArgs
{
    private EventInfo eventInfo;
    private EventHandler<TEventArgType> eventHandler;

    public MyEventList(string eventName, EventHandler<TEventArgType> eventHandler)
    {
        if (eventHandler == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("eventHandler");
        if (eventName == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("eventName");

        this.eventInfo = typeof(TElementType).GetEvent(eventName);

        if (this.eventInfo == null)
            throw new ArgumentException("Specified event not found.", "eventName");

        if (this.eventInfo.EventHandlerType != eventHandler.GetType())
            throw new ArgumentException("EventHandler type does not match specified event.", "eventHandler");

        this.eventHandler = eventHandler;
    }

    public void Add(TElementType item)
    {
        ...
        eventInfo.AddEventHandler(item, this.eventHandler);
        ...
    }

    public bool Remove(TElementType item)
    {
        ...
        eventInfo.RemoveEventHandler(item, this.eventHandler);
        ...
    }

    ...

 }
share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't aware that there was a generic EventHandler. When I used this code, I again received a conversion error, Object of type 'System.EventHandler`1[ExternalProject.CustomEventArgs]' cannot be converted to type 'ExternalProject.CustomEventHandler'. (duh). But, I can at least change my custom event handlers to EventHandlers<CustomEventArgs>. Is there a way to hook any event, not just EventHandler<T> events? Also, I am hearing your warnings. –  Nathan Jul 11 '11 at 18:08
    
@Nathan: Yeah you should be able to. AddEventHandler and RemoveEventHandler take a Delegate as the second argument so you could actually have any old Action<T> or Action<T1,T2,...> as your eventHanlder type. At least I think it should work. –  InBetween Jul 11 '11 at 18:15
    
It not only has to hook the event, but it needs to be able to preserve the arguments of the event as well, which has been difficult. –  Nathan Jul 11 '11 at 18:20
    
@Nathan: EventHandler<T> preserves the argument types. I would recommend this way as coding standards advise you to inherit from System.EventArgs when implementing event handlers with custom event arguments. Anyhow, if this were not possible, Action<T1, T2, ...> would also preserve the argument types of the handler. The only difference is that you are restricted to (object, EventArgs) signature in the former and not in the latter. –  InBetween Jul 11 '11 at 18:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.