Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

from previous help I am using something like this:

(function (global) {

  // your code here

  global.myGlobalVar = myVar

}(this));

which works great for variables, but how do I do it for functions?

For example I tried this:

(function (global) {

  function something()
{
// do something, return something
}

  global.something()= something();

}(this));

but that does not work :(

How do I get it to work with functions?

Thanks!

EDIT:

Please note that this is being called in a html page, first I do this:

<script language="Javascript" src="four.js">

then

<body onload="javascript:something()">
share|improve this question
5  
You have to realize that functions are just values like anything else. You can refer to them with their name and call them by adding parenthesis after their name. –  Felix Kling Jul 11 '11 at 17:14
2  
In onload, you should not write javascript: (it is sometimes used in <a href="">). You just simply write the function name you want to execute. –  kapa Jul 11 '11 at 17:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want to declare a function, you should not execute it. So remove ().

(function (global) {

  function something()
{
// do something, return something
}

  global.something = something; // something is the variable
                                // containing the function and
                                // you store it into global


}(window));
share|improve this answer
    
Note that the global trick used here won't work in ES5 strict mode. –  Reid Jul 11 '11 at 17:16
    
@Reid: I'm not aware of that - could you please elaborate on that? –  pimvdb Jul 11 '11 at 17:16
1  
In this code, this refers to the global object (window). In strict mode, that's no longer the case: this when used like this will give undefined instead. If this anonymous function was executed in the context of another function, it would work, but this will never refer to the global object in strict mode (unless specifically bound). –  Reid Jul 11 '11 at 17:20
2  
For comparison: (function () { return this; }()); returns window, while (function () { 'use strict'; return this; }()); returns undefined. –  Reid Jul 11 '11 at 17:22
    
@Reid: Thanks for your clear explanation. –  pimvdb Jul 11 '11 at 17:23

In Javascript, a function can be stored in a variable (as it is an object basically).

You could do something like this using a closure:

(function (global) {

  global.something= function () {
      // do something, return something
  };

}(this));

Remember, if you write () after a function name, it means you're executing it. If you want to pass the function itself, you simply write its name.

Consider this example:

var x = something(); //x will hold the RETURN value of 'something'
var y = something; //y will hold a reference to the function itself

So after doing the 2nd example, you could do: var x = y(); which will actually give you the same result if you just simply did the 1st example.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I edited my post, please look above. I am getting 2 errors: "global is undefined" (.js file) and "something is not defined" (html file) –  Ryan Jul 11 '11 at 17:28
(function (global) {

  global.something = function()
  {
    // do something, return something
  }

}(this));

Updated question:

<body onload="javascript:something()">

This won't work. Try this instead:

<body onload="something()">
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I edited my post, please look above. I am getting 2 errors: "global is undefined" (.js file) and "something is not defined" (html file) –  Ryan Jul 11 '11 at 17:29
    
If global isn't defined, then your first code block that you said is working, would not work. So what is the code you had that actually works? –  Justin M. Keyes Jul 11 '11 at 17:34
    
@Justin: Your global parameter is only available inside the function, so won't be available to the inline onload. Because you're assigning something to the global object, it should be available from the global window. <body onload="something()"> –  user113716 Jul 11 '11 at 17:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.