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I'm working within WinForms (.net 3.5), and have the following line of code:

     HitTestResult result;
     try
     {
        result = this.HitTest( e.X, e.Y, ChartElementType.DataPoint);
     }
     catch(Exception e)
     {
        //This happens, we don't care!
     }

I have no control over whether HitTest throws an exception, but if it does, I absolutely do not care.

Is it possible to disable my IDE from halting at this SPECIFIC catch block? I understand I can disable the System.FormatException it may throw (from the Debug->Exceptions menu, but that's kind of overkill.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
so this problem only bothers you when debugging your code? –  BrokenGlass Jul 11 '11 at 18:02
2  
I don't have an answer to your question, but you can take off that "e" after "Exception" so VS don't tell you "e" is declared but not used :-D –  Tipx Jul 11 '11 at 18:02
    
Yes, during developement, this exception is sometimes thrown when the code gets executed before my window is painted, which is fine behavior. This will cause my debugger to halt, because I have it set to halt on all thrown exceptions. My hope is that there is some type of debugging attribute I can apply to avoid it from stopping. –  greggorob64 Jul 11 '11 at 18:04
    
So, your main gripe is you don't want it (under debug) to break on throw of this particular FormatException, but do want it to break when other throws for FormatException occur? –  James Michael Hare Jul 11 '11 at 18:08
    
@James it sounds like that, and seems like a reasonable annoyance. –  Michael Jul 11 '11 at 18:12

7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can use the DebbugerStepThrough attribute to skip over that line. From MSDN:

Instructs the debugger to step through the code instead of stepping into the code.

For example:

[DebuggerStepThrough]
public void MyMethod()
{
    HitTestResult result;
    try
    {
        result = this.HitTest(e.X, e.Y, ChartElementType.DataPoint);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        //This happens, we don't care!
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you factor out your code into a separate method you can decorate it with DebuggerStepThrough and the IDE will not halt:

[DebuggerStepThrough]
public void SomeMethod()
{
    HitTestResult result;
    try
    {
        result = this.HitTest(e.X, e.Y, ChartElementType.DataPoint);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        //This happens, we don't care!
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
we submitted at the same time :) –  user195488 Jul 11 '11 at 18:15
    
I think this may be the best solution, I'm about to test it out. –  greggorob64 Jul 11 '11 at 18:15

You can place the try/catch block in its own method and decorate that method with any of the following attributes:

DebuggerStepThrough - causes the debugger to step over the method

DebuggerHidden - hides the method from the debugger (won't even allow breakpoints)

DebuggerNonUserCode - a combination of the previous two

share|improve this answer

See if the DebuggerNonUserCodeAttribute can help you.

share|improve this answer

Try,

 HitTestResult result;
 try
 {
    result = this.HitTest( e.X, e.Y, ChartElementType.DataPoint);
 }
 catch(Exception e)
 {       
    if(!Debugger.IsAttached)
    {
        //This happens, we don't care!
    }
 }
share|improve this answer

Why not do the following?

 HitTestResult result;
 try
 {
    result = this.HitTest( e.X, e.Y, ChartElementType.DataPoint);
 }
 catch(Exception e)
 {
 #if !DEBUG
    //This happens, we don't care!
 #endif
 }  
share|improve this answer
1  
This will not change what the function does in release mode. He wants the debugger to skip the exception that the call to .HitTest makes. –  Michael Jul 11 '11 at 18:08
    
I think he wants to skip it only while developing. If he doesn't want this behavior in release also then why not just delete it? –  InBetween Jul 11 '11 at 18:10
    
I don't think the MSIL generated from this code is will be any different for Debug/Release builds. –  Michael Jul 11 '11 at 18:15
    
This won't work.. It will still stop at the try / catch. That's what he wants to prevent. –  user195488 Jul 11 '11 at 18:17
1  
This does absolutely nothing. –  Igby Largeman Jul 11 '11 at 18:21

I understand you want to break on all exceptions except this one but VS doesn't offer this option.

I would recommend rewriting the HitTest() method so that it handles failures gracefully instead of allowing exceptions to be thrown, for example by validating the input parameters.

Correction: 0A0D's answer shows that this is possible and that will work best with API calls or other code you don't have control over. But when you do, you should consider rewriting it to handle errors gracefully.

share|improve this answer
    
It sounds like HitTest is an API call, as he said he has no control whether is throws an exception. –  Michael Jul 11 '11 at 18:13
    
The exception is thrown in System.Windows.DataVisualization.Charting.HitTest function. When the mousemove event is thrown before the chart is painted, this exception will be thrown. This is from a crappy implementation in the order of eventprocessing from that chart control itself. I'm not going to waste time ensureing that the chart has a "valid, good" painted status before I attempt the mousemove event. If the chart hasn't been drawn, I just want to ignore it. –  greggorob64 Jul 11 '11 at 18:42
    
@CJohnson: A developer who who makes unvalidated assumptions is demonstrating a lack of real world experience. Why do you assume this is laziness? Clearly @greggor has thought about this and reasoned that an empty catch block is the appropriate solution for this case. –  Igby Largeman Jul 11 '11 at 18:52

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