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I have some badly formatted XML that I must parse. Fixing the problem upstream is not possible.

The (current) problem is that ampersand characters are not always escaped properly, so I need to convert & into &

If &amp; is already there, I don't want to change it to &amp;amp;. In general, if any well-formed entity is already there, I don't want to destroy it. I don't think that it's possible, in general, to know all entities that could appear in any particular XML document, so I want a solution where anything like &<characters>; is preserved.

Where <characters> is some set of characters defining an entity between the initial & and the closing ;. In particular, < and > are not literals that would otherwise denote an XML element.

Now, when parsing, if I see &<characters> I don't know whether I'll run into a ;, a (space), end-of-line, or another &. So I think that I have to remember <characters> as I look ahead for a character that will tell me what to do with the original &.

I think that I need the power of a Push Down Automaton to do this, I don't think that a Finite State Machine will work because of what I think is a memory requirement - is that correct? If I need a PDA, then a regular expression in a call to String.replaceAll(String, String) won't work. Or is there a Java regex that can solve this problem?

Remember: there could be multiple replacements per line.

(I'm aware of this question, but it does not provide the answer that I am looking for.)

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5 Answers 5

Here's the regex you're looking for: &([^;\\W]*([^;\\w]|$)), and the corresponding replacement string would be &amp;$1. It matches on &, followed by zero or more non-semicolons or word breaks (it needs to allow zero to match the stand-alone ampersand), followed by a word break that is not a semicolon (or a line end). The capturing group allows you to do the replacement with &amp; that you're looking for.

Here's some sample code using it:

String s = "&amp; & &nsbp; &tc., &tc. &tc";
final String regex = "&([^;\\W]*([^;\\w]|$))";
final String replacement = "&amp;$1";
final String t = s.replaceAll(regex, replacement);

After running this in a sandbox, I get the following result for t:

&amp; &amp; &nsbp; &amp;tc., &amp;tc. &amp;tc

As you can see, the original &amp; and &nbsp; remain unchanged. However, if you try it with "&&", you get &amp;&, and if you try it with "&&&", you get &amp;&&amp;, which I take as a symptom of the look-ahead problem you were alluding to. However, if you replace the line:

final String t = s.replaceAll(regex, replacement);

with:

final String t = s.replaceAll(regex, replacement).replaceAll(regex, replacement);

It works with all of those strings and any others that I could think of. (In a finished product, you'd presumably write a single routine that would do this double replaceAll invocation.)

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Thanks Ben! I tried stuff like this, but couldn't get it to work for all test input. I don't know whether my entire test suite will fit in a comment. Maybe I should write an answer with what I've come up with. In the meantime, please try your solution with input like "&&" (expect "&amp;&amp;") and "&&rarr;&" (expect "&amp;&rarr;&amp;") –  Greg Mattes Jul 12 '11 at 14:08
    
It works with "&&rarr;&", but only with "&&" if you perform it twice. I'll expand my answer accordingly, with the lessons learned. –  Ben Hocking Jul 12 '11 at 17:20
    
Yeah, I thought about repeated applications of the regex too, but that seemed strange to me, but maybe it's not too bad - I wonder if only a double application sufficient in all cases? –  Greg Mattes Jul 12 '11 at 18:12
    
I'm also wondering about the absence of an ampersand in the negated character classes. Don't you want to say "find an ampersand and scan until you see either whitespace/word-break, a semicolon, or another ampersand?" Something like "&foo&bar;" should produce "&amp;foo&bar;" I think that "&&rarr;&" worked because the first ampersand matched as itself. –  Greg Mattes Jul 12 '11 at 18:17
    
An ampersand counts as a word-break, at least with my settings (I can imagine there's a different encoding where it won't work, but I'm not aware of it). I tested the "&foo&bar;" with the double application, and it produced &amp;foo&bar; as you suggest. (I also tested the "&&rarr;&" with the double application and it still works.) I also tested the double application with 6 ampersands in a row, and it replaced all of them. –  Ben Hocking Jul 12 '11 at 18:37
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Start by understanding the grammar around entities: http://www.w3.org/TR/xml/#NT-EntityRef

Then look at the JavaDoc for FilterInputStream: http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/io/FilterInputStream.html

Then implement one that reads the actual input character-by-character. When it sees an ampersand, it switches into "entity mode" and looks for a valid entity reference (& Name ;). If it finds one before the first character that isn't allowed in Name, then it writes it to the output verbatim. Otherwise it writes &amp; followed by everything after the ampersand.

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This is a very interesting approach, quite elegant and clean. –  Greg Mattes Jul 11 '11 at 18:45
    
I'm really interested in figuring out whether an FSM is good enough, or whether a PDA is required. I'll emphasize that in the question. –  Greg Mattes Jul 11 '11 at 18:46
    
A finite state machine is sufficient. You have '&' followed by a defined set of characters, followed by ';'. –  parsifal Jul 11 '11 at 19:04
    
Incidentally, using an InputStream in this way will limit you to ASCII, ISO-8859-X, UTF-8, or another character set that leaves the ASCII subset alone. If you're processing a character set that doesn't do this (I think some Asian sets don't), the process becomes a lot more difficult. –  parsifal Jul 11 '11 at 19:04
    
Yeah, it's actually much more complex than that. I worked on a system many years ago that implemented some very sophisticated XML parsing to deal with malformed documents in the face of many character sets. A general solution is not easy. I'm not doing anything quite that involved for this issue. –  Greg Mattes Jul 11 '11 at 19:11
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Instead of trying to do something generically over all possible bad data, just deal the occurances of bad data, one at a time. Chances are that whatever is generating the XML is messing up one or two characters but not all of em. This is an assumption of course.

Try just replacing all & with & EXCEPT when the & is followed by amp;. If the next improperly encoded charcter you run into is <, then replace them all with <. Keep the rule set small and manageable, only dealing with things you know are wrong.

If you try to do to much, you may end up replacing things you didn't intend to and messing the data up yourself.

I just want to also note that the best solution is to encourage whoever is producing the XML to fix the encoding on their end. This may be awkward to ask but if you explain to them, professionally, that they are not generating valid XML, they may be willing to fix the bug(s). This would have the added benefit of the next person who has to consume it not needed to do some crazy custom code to work around a problem which should be solved at the source. Consider it at least. Worse thing that can happen is that you ask, they say no, and you are right where you are now.

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Thanks for the insights! Yeah, I'm trying to keep it small - I'm not fixing the bad < since it's not been seen, just the ampersand, but I don't want to mess up any correct entity. As for the upstream fix, already attempted - you know how it is ;) –  Greg Mattes Jul 11 '11 at 18:43
    
I'm really interested in figuring out whether an FSM is good enough, or whether a PDA is required. I'll emphasize that in the question. –  Greg Mattes Jul 11 '11 at 18:46
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I think you can also use look-ahead to see if & characters are followed by characters & a semicolon (e.g. &(?!\w*;)). Here's an example:

import java.util.*;
import java.util.regex.*;

public class HelloWorld{
    private static final Pattern UNESCAPED_AMPERSAND =
        Pattern.compile("&(?!\\w*;)");
     public static void main(String []args){
        for (String s : Arrays.asList(
            "http://www.example.com/?a=1&b=2&amp;c=3/",
            "Three in a row: &amp;&&amp;",
            "&lt; is <, &gt; is >, &apos; is ', etc."
        )) {
            System.out.println(
                UNESCAPED_AMPERSAND.matcher(s).replaceAll("&amp;")
            );        
        }
     }
}

// Output:
// http://www.example.com/?a=1&amp;b=2&amp;c=3/
// Three in a row: &amp;&amp;&amp;
// &lt; is <, &gt; is >, &apos; is ', etc.
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Sorry for stirring up an old thread:
I faced the same problem and the workaround I used was in 3 steps:

  1. Identify valid entity references and 'hide' them from regex
  2. replace non-escaped characters using regex
  3. Restore previously 'hidden' entity references

The hiding is done by enclosing entities in custom character sequences. e.g. "#||<ENTITY_NAME>||#"

To illustrate, say we have this XML snippet with unescaped character &:

<NAME>Testname</NAME>
<VALUE>
    random words one &amp; two
    I am sad&happy; at the same time!
    its still &lt; ecstatic
    It is two & three words
    Short form is 2&three
    Now for some invalid entity refs: &amp, &gt, and &lt too.
</VALUE>

Step1:
We use the regex replace "[&]\(amp|apos|gt|lt|quot\)[;]" with "#||$1||#". This is because the valid XML entity references as per W3C are amp,lt,gt,apos & quot. The string now looks like this:

<NAME>Testname</NAME>
<VALUE>
    random words one #||amp||# two
    I am sad&happy; at the same time!
    its still #||lt||# ecstatic
    It is two & three words
    Short form is 2&three
    Now for some invalid entity refs: &amp, &gt, and &lt too.
</VALUE>

Only the valid entity references were hidden. &happy; was left untouched.

Step2:
Do the regex replace "[&]" with "&amp;". The string now looks like this:

<NAME>Testname</NAME>
<VALUE>
    random words one #||amp||# two
    I am sad&amp;happy; at the same time!
    its still #||lt||# ecstatic
    It is two &amp; three words
    Short form is 2&amp;three
    Now for some invalid entity refs: &amp;amp, &amp;gt, and &amp;lt too.
</VALUE>

Step3:
Do the regex replace "#\|\|([a-z]+)\|\|#" with "&$1;". The final corrected string now looks like this:

<NAME>Testname</NAME>
<VALUE>
    random words one &amp; two
    I am sad&amp;happy; at the same time!
    its still &lt; ecstatic
    It is two &amp; three words
    Short form is 2&amp;three
    Now for some invalid entity refs: &amp;amp, &amp;gt, and &amp;lt too.
</VALUE>


Downsides: The custom char sequence to hide the valid entity must be chosen carefully to ensure that no valid content will by chance contain the same sequence. Chances are minimal though, but admitted, this is not a fullproof solution...

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