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Lets say I have this extention method:

public static bool HasFive<T>(this IEnumerable<T> subjects)
{
    if(subjects == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("subjects");

    return subjects.Count() == 5;
}

Do you think this null check and exception throwing is really necessary? I mean, when I use the Count method, an ArgumentNullException will be thrown anyways, right?

I can maybe think of one reason why I should, but would just like to hear others view on this. And yes, my reason for asking is partly laziness (want to write as little as possible), but also because I kind of think a bunch of null checking and exception throwing kind of clutters up the methods which often end up being twice as long as they really needed to be. Someone should know better than to send null into a method :p

Anyways, what do you guys think?


Note: Count() is an extension method and will throw an ArgumentNullException, not a NullReferenceException. See Enumerable.Count<TSource> Method (IEnumerable<TSource>). Try it yourself if you don't believe me =)


Note2: After the answers given here I have been persuaded to start checking more for null values. I am still lazy though, so I have started to use the Enforce class in Lokad Shared Libraries. Can recommend taking a look at it. Instead of my example I can do this instead:

public static bool HasFive<T>(this IEnumerable<T> subjects)
{
    Enforce.Argument(() => subjects);
    return subjects.Count() == 5;
}
share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Yes, it will throw an ArgumentNullException. I can think of two reasons for putting the extra checking in:

  • If you later go back and change the method to do something before calling subjects.Count() and forget to put the check in at that point, you could end up with a side effect before the exception is thrown, which isn't nice.
  • Currently, the stack trace will show subjects.Count() at the top, and probably with a message with the source parameter name. This could be confusing to the caller of HasFive who can see a subjects parameter name.

EDIT: Just to save me having to write it yet again elsewhere:

The call to subjects.Count() will throw an ArgumentNullException, not a NullReferenceException. Count() is another extension method here, and assuming the implementation in System.Linq.Enumerable is being used, that's documented (correctly) to throw an ArgumentNullException. Try it if you don't believe me.

EDIT: Making this easier...

If you do a lot of checks like this you may want to make it simpler to do so. I like the following extension method:

internal static void ThrowIfNull<T>(this T argument, string name)
    where T : class
{
    if (argument == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException(name);
    }
}

The example method in the question can then become:

public static bool HasFive<T>(this IEnumerable<T> subjects)
{
    subjects.ThrowIfNull("subjects");    
    return subjects.Count() == 5;
}

Another alternative would be to write a version which checked the value and returned it like this:

internal static T NullGuard<T>(this T argument, string name)
    where T : class
{
    if (argument == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException(name);
    }
    return argument;
}

You can then call it fluently:

public static bool HasFive<T>(this IEnumerable<T> subjects)
{
    return subjects.NullGuard("subjects").Count() == 5;
}

This is also helpful for copying parameters in constructors etc:

public Person(string name, int age)
{
    this.name = name.NullGuard("name");
    this.age = age;
}

(You might want an overload without the argument name for places where it's not important.)

share|improve this answer
    
Good points. On point #2, what if I renamed my subjects parameter to source? –  Svish Mar 20 '09 at 9:40
    
It will actually throw a System.NullReferenceException. Suggest you edit the post. –  codeape Mar 20 '09 at 9:51
    
@codeape: No it won't, because Count() is also an extension method. Suggest you try it :) –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '09 at 9:59
    
Tried it myself, Jon is correct. But it relies on the Count() method to do the check, so the exception is not so accurate. If I were to use a library that shows a failure in a Count() method that I didn't call, I'd be confused... –  Dan C. Mar 20 '09 at 10:03
    
@Dan C: That's exactly the point of my second bullet :) –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '09 at 10:05

I think @Jon Skeet is absolutely spot on, however I'd like to add the following thoughts:-

  • Providing a meaningful error message is useful for debugging, logging and exception reporting. An exception thrown by the BCL is less likely to describe the specific circumstances of the exception WRT your codebase. Perhaps this is less of an issue with null checks which (most of the time) necessarily can't give you much domain-specific information - 'I was passed a null unexpectedly, no idea why' is pretty much the best you can do most of the time, however sometimes you can provide more information and obviously this is more likely to be relevant when dealing with other exception types.
  • The null check clearly demonstrates to other developers and you, a form of documentation, if/when you come back to the code a year later, that it's possible someone might pass a null, and it would be problematic if they did so.
  • Expanding on Jon's excellent point - you might do something before the null gets picked up - I think it is vitally important to engage in defensive programming. Checking for an exception before running other code is a form of defensive programming as you are taking into account things might not work the way you expected (or changes might be made in the future that you didn't expect) and ensuring that no matter what happens (assuming your null check isn't removed) such problems cannot arise.
  • It's a form of runtime assert that your parameter is not null. You can proceed on the assumption that it isn't.
  • The above assumption can result in slimmer code, you write the rest of your code knowing the parameter is not null, cutting down on extraneous subsequent null checks.
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In my opinion you should check for the null value. Two things that comes to mind.

It makes explicit the possible errors that can happen during runtime.

It also gives you a chance to throw a better exception instead of a generic ArgumentNullException. Thus, making the reason for the exception more explicit.

share|improve this answer
    
better exception? like specifying what parameter that was null? or different exception? On making it explicit, could I maybe just as well add the exception to the xml doc? –  Svish Mar 20 '09 at 9:30
    
Yes. What I meant is to make the reason for the exception explicit. –  Marcel Tjandraatmadja Mar 20 '09 at 9:32

The exception that you will get thrown will be an Object reference not set to an instance of an object.

Not the most useful of exceptions when tracking down the problem.

The way you have it there will give you much more useful information by specifically stating that it's your subjects reference that is null.

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No, an ArgumentNullException will be thrown because Count() is also an extension method, which is documented to throw ArgumentNullException if the source is null. –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '09 at 9:31
    
Yes, the Count() was just used as an example because it also throws an ArgumentNullException. –  Svish Mar 20 '09 at 9:41

I think it is a good practice to do precondition checks at the top of the function. Maybe it's just my code that is full of bugs, but this practice catched a lot of errors for me.

Also, it's much easier to figure out the source of the problem if you got an ArgumentNullException with the name of the parameter, thrown from the most relevant stack frame. Also, the code in the body of your function can change over time so I wouldn't depend on it catching precondition problems in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point on name of parameter and stack frame. –  Svish Mar 20 '09 at 9:42

It always depends on the context (in my opinion).

For instance, when writing a library (for others to use), it certainly makes sense to fully check each and every parameter and throw the appropriate exceptions.

When writing methods that are used inside a project, I usually skip those checks, attempting to reduce the size of the codebase. But even in this case, there might be a level (between application layers) where you still place such checks. It depends on the context, on the size of the project, on the size of the team working on it...

It certainly doesn't make sense doing it for small projects built by one person :)

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No, calling Count() throws ArgumentNullException because Count() is an extension method. In other words, the same check is being performed already, but in a different method. The result will still be an ArgumentNullException, but with a bigger stack trace and a different message. –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '09 at 9:33
    
Yep, just checked that, you're correct. I'll remove that part, but the rest of the answer still holds... –  Dan C. Mar 20 '09 at 9:59
    
+1 its my opinion too –  TcKs Mar 20 '09 at 12:15

It depends on the concrete method. In this case - I think, the exception is not necesary and the better usage will be, if teh extension method can deal with null.

public static bool HasFive<T>(this IEnumerable<T> subjects) {
    if ( object.ReferenceEquals( subjects, null ) ) { return false; }

    return subjects.Count() == 5;
}

If you call "items.HasFive()" and the "items" is null, then is true that items has not five items.

But if you have extension method:

public static T GetFift<T>(this IEnumerable<T> subjects) {
    ...
}

The exception for "subjects == null" should be called, because there is no valid way, how to deal with it.

share|improve this answer
    
guess your GetFifth method should return T? =) anyways, good point as well. –  Svish Mar 20 '09 at 12:20
    
@Svich: Ctrl+C, Ctrl+V bug :). Thanks for alert. –  TcKs Mar 20 '09 at 12:22

If you look at the source to the Enumerable class (System.Core.dll) where a lot of the default extension methods are defined for IEnumerables classes, you can see that they all check for null references with arguments.

public static IEnumerable<TSource> Skip<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, int count)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }
    return SkipIterator<TSource>(source, count);
}

It's a bit of an obvious point, but I tend to follow what I find in the base framework library source as you know that is more than likely to be best practices.

share|improve this answer
    
There's an interesting difference here though - that check is making sure the exception is thrown immediately, before deferred execution kicks in. In this case, with Count(), the exception would still be thrown immediately. The only difference will be in the stack trace and error message. –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '09 at 9:57
    
They give the same stacktrace though don't they? As Error.ArgumentNull () returns a new ArgumentNullException –  Chris S Mar 20 '09 at 10:34

Yes, for two reasons:

Firstly, the other extension methods on IEnumerable do and consumers of your code can expect yours to do so as well, but secondly and more importantly, if you have a long chain of operators in your query then knowing which one threw the exception is useful information.

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In my opinion one should check for known conditions that will raise errors later on (at least for public methods). That way it's easier to detect the root of the problem.

I would raise a more informational exception like:

if (subjects == null)
{
     throw new ArgumentNullException("subjects ", "subjects is null.");
}
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't give any more information than the example shown. The only information is the name of the argument which was null, and that's already being supplied. Why complicate things? –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '09 at 9:56

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