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Does the Java API provide a function which computes the next largest prime number given an input x?

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Not until you write one. –  Corey Ogburn Jul 11 '11 at 18:25
    
I think for someone at Sun / Oracle to develop this; test it; QA it; code review it; document it; and translate the documentation; for something that will be RARELY used; would be a waste of money. –  vcsjones Jul 11 '11 at 18:27
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What does your iphone have to do with this question? –  dave Jul 11 '11 at 18:27
    
Dang! Alright cool thank you! –  user114518 Jul 11 '11 at 18:35
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Its in the Math package. Math.completeHomeWorkAssignment(CS101Assignment assignment); –  Woot4Moo Jul 11 '11 at 19:05
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That would be a pretty esoteric method, and not really a great candidate for inclusion in a general class library. You would need to write this yourself, using either a test or a sieve.

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sieve is used for finding all primes less than a particular number - in this case use a test :) –  Matthew Gilliard Jul 11 '11 at 18:30
    
Sure, but you can always generate primes up to N first, and then "next" (below N) becomes trivial. :) –  dlev Jul 11 '11 at 18:31
    
why would it be esoteric? why it's not a "great" candidate for a library? and why there is a method in the JDK that does exactly this? BigInteger.nextProbablePrime(). i think you didn't give the right answer and i am shure you didn't give the solution. –  Thomas Uhrig Oct 21 '11 at 8:03
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Yes, there really is no such function!

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There is BigInteger.nextProbablePrime() which may suit if you are working with large integers. Otherwise you can write your own easily enough. Here is one I prepared earlier:

static long nextPrime(long previous) {
  if (previous < 2L) { return 2L; }
  if (previous == 2L) { return 3L; }
  long next = 0L;
  int increment = 0;
  switch ((int)(previous % 6L)) {
    case 0: next = previous + 1L; increment = 4; break;
    case 1: next = previous + 4L; increment = 2; break;
    case 2: next = previous + 3L; increment = 2; break;
    case 3: next = previous + 2L; increment = 2; break;
    case 4: next = previous + 1L; increment = 2; break;
    case 5: next = previous + 2L; increment = 4; break;
  }
  while (!isPrime(next)) {
    next += increment;
    increment = 6 - increment;   // 2, 4 alternating
  }
  return next;
}

This uses a 2, 4 wheel to skip over multiples of 2 and 3. You will need a prime testing method:

boolean isPrime(long toTest) { ... }

which returns true if its parameter is prime, false otherwise.

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isn't THAT the solution? everybody in this post says that there is NO method to get a prime numbers - but there is. BigInteger.nextProbablePrime() like rossum says. the people are making fun of the question, saying that you should make your homework on your own, but they don't even know the answer. –  Thomas Uhrig Oct 21 '11 at 8:00
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public class nextprime {

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    int count = 0;
    int n = 17;
    for (int i = 2; i <= n / 2; i++) {
        if (n % i == 0) {
            count++;

        }
    }
    if (count == 0) {
        System.out.println("prime");
        for (int p = n + 1; p >0; p++) {
            int y=0;
            for (int i = 2; i <= p / 2; i++) {
                if (p % i == 0) {
                    y++;

                }
            }
            if(y==0)
            {
                System.out.println("Next prime "+p);
                break;
            }
        }
    } else {
        System.out.print("not prime");
    }
  }

}

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As far as I can read this, this will first determine that 17 is indeed prime, than inefficiently determine that 18 isn't and then determine that 19 is. –  SWeko Jan 24 '13 at 7:33
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Primes.nextPrime(int n) from Apache Commons Math is what you need.

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