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I want to make body have 100% of the browser height. Can I do that using CSS?

I tried setting height: 100%, but it doesn't work.

I want to set a background color for a page to fill the entire browser window, but if the page has little content I get a ugly white bar at the bottom.

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1  
How are you applying the background color? –  BoltClock Jul 11 '11 at 18:52
    
btw, what browser (and version) you use? –  Optillect Team Jul 11 '11 at 18:57
1  
body{background-color:#000;} I use Opera 11.5 –  bodyofheat Jul 11 '11 at 19:00
    
unfortunately, "height:100%;" never works.. width - yes, height - no. –  Optillect Team Jul 11 '11 at 19:11
1  

11 Answers 11

up vote 359 down vote accepted

Try setting the height of the html element to 100% as well.

html, body
{
    height: 100%;
}

BODY looks at its parent HTML, to know how to scale the property dynamically. This means the HTML element has to have its height set as well.

However the content of body will probably need to change dynamically, as content grows taller. Setting min-height to 100% will accomplish this goal.

html{
  height: 100%;
}
body {
  min-height: 100%;
}
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2  
thanks, this seem to remove the white bar on short pages, but now on pages which height exceeds the browser window height I get a 20px white bar at the bottom :| –  bodyofheat Jul 11 '11 at 19:01
22  
ok I found out! it works if I add html,body{min-height:100%;} :D –  bodyofheat Jul 11 '11 at 19:32
1  
Make a website with this as the only text on it. This is beyond useful for beginning web designers. –  notbad.jpeg Jul 26 '12 at 19:03
1  
doesn't work for Chrome –  bFunc Jul 19 '14 at 12:29
1  
Note: if you use the body {min-height} version then you cannot use .body-child{height: 100%} trick. –  Salman A Dec 6 '14 at 9:52

If you have a background image then you will want to set this instead:

html{
  height: 100%;
}
body {
  min-height: 100%;
}

This ensures that your body tag is allowed to continue growing when the content is taller than the viewport and that the background image continues to repeat/scroll/whatever when you start scrolling down.

Remember if you have to support IE6 you will need to find a way to wedge in height:100% for body, IE6 treats height like min-height anyway.

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Also works when there is a global flexbox right under body (body > #flexbox-wrapper) –  Norris Jun 14 '13 at 12:41
1  
This is the correct answer, as the accepted answer will not grow as content gets longer than a single screen. –  SimplGy Jun 21 '13 at 22:10
    
Thank you so much, Angry Dan, that ugly white space at the bottom of my site is gone! –  Bob May 7 '14 at 15:37
    
Of course, since this question was posed, view port based dimensions became a Thing. So now you can just do body{min-height: 100vh} –  Angry Dan Jul 8 at 15:39

If you want to keep the margins on the body and don't want scroll bars, use the following css:

html { height:100%; }
body { position:absolute; top:0; bottom:0; right:0; left:0; }

Setting body {min-height:100%} will give you scroll bars.

See demo at http://jsbin.com/aCaDahEK/2/edit?html,output .

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3  
Thank you for the only working answer :) I assume 'absolute' made it work –  Dmitry Matveev Jul 8 '14 at 10:14
    
+1 This finally works!! thank you very much –  Daenu Aug 7 '14 at 16:53
    
Works well for me in Firefox without scrollbars, thank you. The accepted answer does not. –  Andrew Jul 8 at 8:00

As an alternative to setting both the html and body element's heights to 100%, you could also use viewport-percentage lengths.

5.1.2. Viewport-percentage lengths: the ‘vw’, ‘vh’, ‘vmin’, ‘vmax’ units

The viewport-percentage lengths are relative to the size of the initial containing block. When the height or width of the initial containing block is changed, they are scaled accordingly.

In this instance, you could use the value 100vh - which is the height of the viewport.

Example Here

body {
    height: 100vh;
}
body {
    min-height: 100vh;
}

This is supported in most modern browsers - support can be found here.

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Besides the fact that this is dead simple, it's also good that we adopt new practices. –  panw Jun 29 at 20:07
1  
@niaster I definitely agree. Browser support has already improved since I posted this answer as well :) –  Josh Crozier Jun 29 at 20:12
1  
This should now become an accepted answer. –  incarnate Jul 7 at 9:37
1  
@incarnate Yeah.. too bad it isn't :) It looks like the last time the OP was online was in 7/11/11 (the date the question was asked..) So I doubt that will change. –  Josh Crozier Jul 7 at 13:06
    
Not sure why we need to start "adopting new practices" when the old practice works fine. There's no advantage to doing this: the code is not smaller, nor does it perform any better, and there are still browsers out there that don't support vw/vh. –  cimmanon Aug 3 at 23:02
html,body
{
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}
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Works for updated Chrome and FF @ 09.2014 –  bFunc Jul 19 '14 at 12:29

Here:

html,body{
    height:100%;
}

body{
  margin:0;
  padding:0
  background:blue;
}
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CSS3 has a new method.

 height:100vh

It makes ViewPort 100% equal to the height.

So your Code should be

 body{
 height:100vh; 
 }
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1  
How is this different than the answer I posted a year ago in September? –  Josh Crozier Jul 8 at 0:47
@media all {
* {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

html, body {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
} }
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html {
    background: url(images/bg.jpg) no-repeat center center fixed; 
    -webkit-background-size: cover;
    -moz-background-size: cover;
    -o-background-size: cover;
    background-size: cover;
    min-height: 100%;
}
html body {
    min-height: 100%
}

Works for all major browsers: FF, Chrome, Opera, IE9+. Works with Background images and gradients. Scrollbars are available as content needs.

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About the extra space at the bottom: is your page an ASP.NET application? If so, there is probably a wrapping almost everything in your markup. Don't forget to style the form as well. Adding overflow:hidden; to the form might remove the extra space at the bottom.

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1  
I do not recommend using overflow:hidden unless you have a really good reason. Find out why things are overflowing and adjust so it will not overflow instead –  jontro Jan 19 at 14:37

A quick update

html, body{
    min-height:100%;
    overflow:auto;
}
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How does this offer anything different over the existing answers? –  cimmanon Aug 3 at 23:05
    
I have tried others also, but did not work for me. This one worked, so it can be a solution to someone needy. @cimmanon –  Jayant Varshney Aug 4 at 4:47

protected by Josh Crozier May 12 '14 at 22:36

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