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The following code behaves differently when built in Release mode (or Debug with optimizations on) and run without the Visual Studio debugger attached.

It also only seems to replicate if the x86 JITter is used. I have tested this on an x86 machine as well as running in WOW64 on a x64 machine (by setting the Platform target to x86).

I've only tried this with .NET 4.0.

When running outside the debugger in Release I see:

Value is 4

When running inside the debugger the e.Value.Length portion of the WriteLine call throws NullReferenceException, which is what I expected to have happen.

The code:

namespace Test
{
    class UsingReleasable<T>
    {
        public UsingReleasable(T obj)
        {
            m_obj = obj;
        }

        public T Release()
        {
            T tmp = m_obj;
            m_obj = default(T);
            return tmp;
        }

        public T Value
        {
            get { return m_obj; }
        }

        T m_obj;
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var e = new UsingReleasable<string>("test");
            e.Release();
            System.Console.WriteLine("Value is {0}", e.Value.Length);
        }
    }
}

My peering at the JIT generated code makes me think it is a bug in that piece, but I wanted to double check here before forwarding this on to MS Connect.

share|improve this question
1  
Can you post the jit as well? –  Oskar Kjellin Jul 11 '11 at 22:19
3  
I've said it before and I'll say it again: "If you think you've found a problem with the .NET runtime (Potential .NET x86 JIT issue?) you're probably wrong". Now let me look at this again. –  jcolebrand Jul 11 '11 at 22:19
2  
I would vote for this to be a bug. Just tried it and it does indeed behave differently in release and debug –  Oskar Kjellin Jul 11 '11 at 22:25
4  
Wouldn't be the first JITter bug found on StackOverflow, although usually the x64 JITter is the buggy one :) SELECT may not be broken often, but the JITter sometimes is. –  Michael Stum Jul 11 '11 at 22:27
2  
@Dan var is static typed (just implicit, not explicit) - and in this case it is UsingReleasable<string> ;p But indeed, with an odd bug like this little can be assumed... –  Marc Gravell Jul 11 '11 at 22:40

1 Answer 1

I can reproduce your behavior:

R:\>csc /platform:x86 releasable.cs
Microsoft (R) Visual C# 2010 Compiler version 4.0.30319.1
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.


R:\>releasable

Unhandled Exception: System.NullReferenceException: Object reference not set to
an instance of an object.
   at Test.Program.Main(String[] args)

R:\>csc /o+ /platform:x86 releasable.cs
Microsoft (R) Visual C# 2010 Compiler version 4.0.30319.1
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.


R:\>releasable
Value is 4

R:\>csc /platform:anycpu releasable.cs
Microsoft (R) Visual C# 2010 Compiler version 4.0.30319.1
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.


R:\>releasable

Unhandled Exception: System.NullReferenceException: Object reference not set to
an instance of an object.
   at Test.Program.Main(String[] args)

R:\>csc /o+ /platform:anycpu releasable.cs
Microsoft (R) Visual C# 2010 Compiler version 4.0.30319.1
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.


R:\>releasable

Unhandled Exception: System.NullReferenceException: Object reference not set to
an instance of an object.
   at Test.Program.Main(String[] args)

The /checked compiler option makes no difference. Neither does generation of debug data /debug+. And the problem persists when Console.ReadLine() is called (to give a chance to attach the debugger and see optimized code.


I made a slight modification to Main to permit debugging of the optimized code:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var e = new UsingReleasable<string>("test");
        System.Console.WriteLine("attach now");
        System.Console.ReadLine();
        e.Release();
        System.Console.WriteLine("Value is {0}", e.Value.Length);
    }

And the actual disassembly:

--- r:\releasable.cs -----------------------------------------------------------
            var e = new UsingReleasable<string>("test");
00000000  push        ebp 
00000001  mov         ebp,esp 
00000003  push        edi 
00000004  push        esi 
00000005  mov         ecx,1839B0h 
0000000a  call        FFF81FB0 
0000000f  mov         esi,eax 
00000011  mov         eax,dword ptr ds:[03772030h] 
00000017  lea         edx,[esi+4] 
0000001a  call        60452F70 
            System.Console.WriteLine("attach now");
0000001f  call        5E927060 
00000024  mov         ecx,eax 
00000026  mov         edx,dword ptr ds:[03772034h] 
0000002c  mov         eax,dword ptr [ecx] 
0000002e  mov         eax,dword ptr [eax+3Ch] 
00000031  call        dword ptr [eax+10h] 
00000034  call        5EEF9A40 
00000039  mov         ecx,eax 
0000003b  mov         eax,dword ptr [ecx] 
0000003d  mov         eax,dword ptr [eax+2Ch] 
00000040  call        dword ptr [eax+1Ch] 
            e.Release();
00000043  mov         edi,dword ptr [esi+4]              ; edi = e.Value
00000046  lea         esi,[esi+4]                        ; esi = &e.Value
00000049  xor         edx,edx                            ; edx = null
0000004b  mov         dword ptr [esi],edx                ; *esi = edx (e.Value = null)
0000004d  mov         ecx,5EBE28F8h
00000052  call        FFF81FB0
00000057  mov         edx,eax 
00000059  mov         eax,dword ptr [edi+4]              ; this sets EAX to 4
0000005c  mov         dword ptr [edx+4],eax 
0000005f  mov         esi,edx 
00000061  call        5E927060 
00000066  push        esi 
00000067  mov         ecx,eax 
00000069  mov         edx,dword ptr ds:[03772038h] 
0000006f  mov         eax,dword ptr [ecx] 
00000071  mov         eax,dword ptr [eax+3Ch] 
00000074  call        dword ptr [eax+18h]                ; this results in the output "Value is 4\n"
00000077  pop         esi 
        }
00000078  pop         edi 
00000079  pop         ebp 
0000007a  ret 

When the program starts under the debugger, this code is generated instead (and does produce a NullReferenceException:

--- r:\releasable.cs -----------------------------------------------------------
            var e = new UsingReleasable<string>("test");
00000000  push        ebp 
00000001  mov         ebp,esp 
00000003  sub         esp,24h 
00000006  mov         dword ptr [ebp-4],ecx 
00000009  cmp         dword ptr ds:[001E313Ch],0 
00000010  je          00000017 
00000012  call        606B6807 
00000017  xor         edx,edx 
00000019  mov         dword ptr [ebp-0Ch],edx 
0000001c  mov         ecx,1E39B0h 
00000021  call        FFF91FB0 
00000026  mov         dword ptr [ebp-10h],eax 
00000029  mov         edx,dword ptr ds:[032E2030h] 
0000002f  mov         ecx,dword ptr [ebp-10h] 
00000032  call        dword ptr ds:[001E3990h] 
00000038  mov         eax,dword ptr [ebp-10h] 
0000003b  mov         dword ptr [ebp-0Ch],eax 
            System.Console.WriteLine("attach now");
0000003e  mov         ecx,dword ptr ds:[032E2034h] 
00000044  call        5E8D703C 
            System.Console.ReadLine();
00000049  call        5EEAA728 
0000004e  nop 
            e.Release();
0000004f  mov         ecx,dword ptr [ebp-0Ch] 
00000052  cmp         dword ptr [ecx],ecx 
00000054  call        dword ptr ds:[001E3994h] 
0000005a  nop 
            System.Console.WriteLine("Value is {0}", e.Value.Length);
0000005b  mov         eax,dword ptr ds:[032E2038h] 
00000061  mov         dword ptr [ebp-14h],eax 
00000064  mov         ecx,dword ptr [ebp-0Ch] 
00000067  cmp         dword ptr [ecx],ecx 
00000069  call        dword ptr ds:[001E3998h] 
0000006f  mov         dword ptr [ebp-18h],eax 
00000072  mov         ecx,dword ptr [ebp-18h] 
00000075  cmp         dword ptr [ecx],ecx                 ; access violation here
00000077  call        608CBA5B 
0000007c  mov         dword ptr [ebp-8],eax 
0000007f  mov         ecx,5EBE28F8h 
00000084  call        FFF91FB0
00000089  mov         dword ptr [ebp-1Ch],eax 
0000008c  mov         eax,dword ptr [ebp-14h] 
0000008f  mov         dword ptr [ebp-20h],eax 
00000092  mov         eax,dword ptr [ebp-1Ch] 
00000095  mov         edx,dword ptr [ebp-8] 
00000098  mov         dword ptr [eax+4],edx 
0000009b  mov         eax,dword ptr [ebp-1Ch] 
0000009e  mov         dword ptr [ebp-24h],eax 
000000a1  mov         ecx,dword ptr [ebp-20h] 
000000a4  mov         edx,dword ptr [ebp-24h] 
000000a7  call        5E8CD460 
        }
000000ac  nop 
000000ad  mov         esp,ebp 
000000af  pop         ebp 
000000b0  ret 

I think I've commented all the relevant lines of code in the incorrect version. Clearly register edi is used to hold a pointer to e.Value, which consists most likely of a pointer to content (at offset 0) and a length (at offset 4) of the v-table (at offset 0), length (at offset 4), followed immediately by the content. Unfortunately e.Value (the string "test") is copied into edi before e.Value is cleared, so the length is fetched using the wrong string pointer. Ouch!


Bug filed on Connect (please upvote!): x86 JIT improperly reorders load of field of generic type with assignment to default(T)

share|improve this answer
4  
Is this really an answer? :S –  Oskar Kjellin Jul 11 '11 at 22:27
1  
@Oskar: it will be. It's also way too long for a comment. –  Ben Voigt Jul 11 '11 at 22:28
2  
(imagines Ben Voigt is comparing IL from the two builds to see if it is the compiler vs JIT, so steps away content it is in capable hands) –  Marc Gravell Jul 11 '11 at 22:31
4  
@FatKenny: If behavior of an optimized build changes depending on whether it's started inside debugger vs attached later, then it's a JIT bug. You diagnosed that correctly. –  Ben Voigt Jul 11 '11 at 23:11
2  
By the way, if you don't want to mess with the ReadLine business, you can edit your debugger settings and un-check the "Suppress JIT optimization on module load" option. That lets you see the same code you would see if you started it outside the debugger. –  Charlie Jul 12 '11 at 15:04

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