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I'm having a bit of a brain fart on making this code more concise(preferably a single boolean expression)

This is my code:

                    if (d.Unemployed)
                    {
                        if (type.Unemployed)
                        {
                            tmp.Unemployed = true;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            tmp.Unemployed = false;
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        if (type.Unemployed)
                        {
                            tmp.Unemployed = false;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            tmp.Unemployed = true;
                        }
                    }

Basically the point is that if either type or d is not unemployed, then tmp should be set to not unemployed.

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Do you mean “type or d is not unemployed, but not both ”? –  svick Jul 11 '11 at 22:37
    
@svick: Yes, that's confirmed by the if-else logic in the code. –  Justin ᚅᚔᚈᚄᚒᚔ Jul 11 '11 at 22:41
    
@Justin, that's why I asked. Your code says something else than your text, or at least it's not clear they mean the same thing. –  svick Jul 11 '11 at 22:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

How about:

tmp.Unemployed = type.Unemployed == d.Unemployed;
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Ah, now it's obvious that I think about it. Just needed another pair of eyes I guess –  Earlz Jul 11 '11 at 22:39
tmp.Unemployed = d.Unemployed || type.Unemployed ? !tmp.Unemployed : null;
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The above code means "both unemployed or both not unemployed". Thus, not (A xor B):

 tmp.Unemployed = ! ( D.Unemployed ^ type.Unemployed)
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Thinking about how much "brain fart" this caused you I would consider using a well named variable to avoid having to go through this mental process again in future. Something like this:

isTmpUnemployed = (type.Unemployed == d.Unemployed);
tmp.Unemployed = isTmpUnemployed;
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If we construct a truth table by following the code, we get

d  | type | tmp
---+------+----
1  |   1  |  1
---+------+----
1  |   0  |  0
----+-----+----
0  |   1  |  0
----+-----+----
0  |   0  |  1

The above is equivalent with the negation of the xor operation.

tmp = not (d xor type)

If the language doesn't have the xor operator we can use the != on boolean values.

tmp = ! (d != type);
// or
tmp = d == type;
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