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I have classA and I define a global array in classA

our @myArray = {"1","2","3","4"}

I have classB in which I have a object of classA. I tried accessing myArray as follows.

$my_obj_of_classA->{'myArray'} 
$my_obj_of_classA->{'\@myArray'} 
$my_obj_of_classA->{\@myArray} 

None of these work. I get an error saying:

Global symbol "@my_array" requires explicit package name

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closed as not a real question by Flimzy, Ken White, gbn, Caleb, Graviton Jul 12 '11 at 2:36

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What error does it give? –  Flimzy Jul 11 '11 at 23:05
1  
use strict;, use warnings; and try to write something that at least looks like Perl. –  friedo Jul 11 '11 at 23:07
1  
Step away from the global state, and start passing parameters. –  Matt Ball Jul 11 '11 at 23:08
    
I am getting the error because I use strict in my code. I have updated the question. I understand passing parameters is better, but can you help me with passing global array as a parameter. –  user238021 Jul 11 '11 at 23:12
    
I get this \Global symbol "@my_array" requires explicit package name –  user238021 Jul 11 '11 at 23:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This question contains a deep misunderstanding of how global variables and objects work in Perl. It looks like you're expecting @myArray to act something like a class variable in Ruby in that you can access it on any given object of that class. That is not how globals in Perl work at all.

I could answer your question, but you'll just run afoul of another misunderstanding. I think it best if you backed up and at least skimmed Perl from the start. Reviewing Modern Perl would be a good idea.

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I am a Java programmer. Trying to do something quick in perl and stuck with this. If you can answer my question, I would appreciate it. –  user238021 Jul 11 '11 at 23:25
2  
@user238021 Sorry, without a basic understanding of the language you'll just be back with another basic question. And lord knows what else you'll do to that poor Perl program, I'm not giving you ammo. Read the book or hire a contractor. –  Schwern Jul 12 '11 at 17:38

First off, this:

package classA;
...
our @myArray = {"1","2","3","4"}

declares a package (sometimes called global) variable @classA::myArray, containing a single element whose value is a hashref. I suspect you meant this instead:

our @myArray = ("1","2","3","4");

Secondly, you can just access that array from any other package by fully qualifying it as @classA::myArray. Perl does not provide automatically available class or object methods for interacting with global variables. If you want, you can create one in your classA as simply as saying:

sub myArray { \@myArray }

if you want it to get a reference to the array or

sub myArray { @myArray }

if you want it (in list context) to get the elements of the array.

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This means that the @my_array is not defined as a global variable. Since you haven't posted your actual code, I can't provide more information than that. Of course, this isn't really providing any information at all, either, since it's just telling you exactly what the error message told you.

If you improve your question, I'll improve my answer.

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What information do you need. Please let me know. Is my declaration of array incorrect, is the way I access it incorrect. What is it? How does providing the logic of my code help in this scenario. –  user238021 Jul 11 '11 at 23:21

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