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Sorry for the bad title, I really don't know how to word it better.

I have a SQL table named Posts and a class named Post. A post can be multiple things such as a Thread or a ThreadReply, which are subclasses of Post but are all stored in the same Post table. To identify the type of Post it has a PostType field.

[Table(Name = "Posts")]
public class Post
{
    [Column(IsPrimaryKey = true, IsDbGenerated = true, AutoSync = AutoSync.OnInsert)]
    public int Id { get; set; }

    [Column]
    public PostType Type { get; set; }

    // ...
 }

 public class Thread : Post { /* ... */ };
 public class ThreadReply : Post { /* ... */ };

I use this to get the posts from the database in my IPostsRepository:

 db.GetTable<Post>(); // IQueryable<Post>

However they are all instantiated as Post (obviously). I want them to be instantiated based on their PostType, so that things like Thread t = p as Thread; will work.

Any ideas?

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Note: a solution that returns a IQueryable<...> containing only one post type is not acceptable; it must be "mixed" as sometimes I have to work with all posts, regardless of their type –  Andreas Bonini Jul 11 '11 at 23:40
2  
Use IsDiscriminator attribute to define table per Class Hierarchy. Check this link: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… and blogs.microsoft.co.il/blogs/bursteg/archive/2007/10/01/… –  Chandu Jul 11 '11 at 23:49
    
@Cybernate, you should post an answer so I can upvote it... and btw, wow, cool, didn't know you could do this with Linq to SQL.... –  Jon Jul 11 '11 at 23:56
    
@Cybernate: yeah, post it as an answer.. The first link TBH was very vague but the second one definitely answered my question. –  Andreas Bonini Jul 11 '11 at 23:58
    
@Jon and @Andreas: Added the comment as an answer. Thx –  Chandu Jul 12 '11 at 0:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use IsDiscriminator attribute to define table per Class Hierarchy.

Check these links:

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I think that second link is broken. This alternate version seems to work though: blogs.microsoft.co.il/blogs/bursteg/archive/2007/10/01/… –  knightpfhor Jul 12 '11 at 21:33
    
@Knight: Fixed it –  Chandu Jul 12 '11 at 21:39

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