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I got an exception while parsing a string to byte

String Str ="9B7D2C34A366BF890C730641E6CECF6F";

String [] st=Str.split("(?<=\\G.{2})");

byte[]bytes = new byte[st.length];
for (int i = 0; i <st.length; i++) {
 bytes[i] = Byte.parseByte(st[i],16);
}
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1  
When you printed the value of st what did you see? –  S.Lott Jul 12 '11 at 0:53
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's because the default parse method expects a number in decimal format, to parse hexadecimal number, use this parse:

Byte.parseByte(st[i], 16);

Where 16 is the base for the parsing.

As for your comment, you are right. The maximum value of Byte is 0x7F. So you can parse it as int and perform binary AND operation with 0xff to get the LSB, which is your byte:

bytes[i] = Integer.parseInt(st[i], 16) & 0xFF;
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after changing but got this exception java.lang.NumberFormatException: Value out of range. Value:"9B" Radix:16 –  Qaiser Mehmood Jul 12 '11 at 1:14
    
You're rught - Byte is a signed type, its max value is 0x7F. Use the following instead bytes[i] = Integer.parseInt(st[i], 16) & 0xFF; as integer is big enough and binary operation is allowed. –  MByD Jul 12 '11 at 1:17
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Assuming you want to parse the string as hexadecimal, try this:

bytes[i] = Byte.parseByte(st[i], 16);

The default radix is 10, and obviously B is not a base-10-digit.

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after changing but got this exception java.lang.NumberFormatException: Value out of range. Value:"9B" Radix:16 –  Qaiser Mehmood Jul 12 '11 at 1:14
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Java is very picky on signedness, it will not accept values to overflow. Thus, if you parse a Byte and it is larger than 127 (for example, 130 dec or 83 hex) you will get a NumberFormatException. Same happens if you parse an 8 digit hex number as an Integer (or a 16 digit hex number as a Long) and it starts with 8-F. Such values will not be interpreted as negative (two's complement) but as illegal.

If you think that this is anal retentive, I totally agree. But that's Java style.

To parse hex values as two's complement numbers either use a large enough integer type (for example, if you are parsing a Byte use Integer instead and type cast it to a byte later) or -- if you need to parse a Long, split the number in half it is 16 digits, then combine. Here's an example:

public static long longFromHex(String s) throws IllegalArgumentException {
    if (s.length() == 16)
        return (Long.parseLong(s.substring(0,8),16)<<32)|(Long.parseLong(s.substring(8,16),16)&0xffffffffL);
    return Long.parseLong(s, 16);
}

Or, to read a Byte, just use Integer instead:

public static byte byteFromHex(String s) throws IllegalArgumentException {
    int i = Integer.parseInt(s, 16);
    if (i < 0 || i > 255) throw new IllegalArgumentException("input string "+s+" does not fit into a Byte");
    return (byte)i;
}
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