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I use python + mongodb to store some item ranking data in a collection called chart

{
  date: date1,
  region: region1,
  ranking: [
    {
      item: bson.dbref.DBRef(db.item.find_one()),
      price: current_price,
      version: '1.0'
    },
    {
      item: bson.dbref.DBRef(db.item.find_another_one()),
      price: current_price,
      version: '1.0'
    },
    .... (and the array goes on) 
  ]
}

Now my problem is, I want to make a history ranking chart for itemA. And according to the $ positional operator, the query should be something like this:

db.chart.find( {'ranking.item': bson.dbref.DBRef('item', itemA._id)}, ['$'])

And the $ operator doesn't work.

Any other possible solution to this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The $ positional operator is only used in update(...) calls, you can't use it to return the position within an array.

However, you can use field projection to limit the fields returned to just those you need to calculate the position in the array from within Python:

db.foo.insert({
'date': '2011-04-01',
'region': 'NY',
'ranking': [
{ 'item': 'Coca-Cola', 'price': 1.00, 'version': 1 },
{ 'item': 'Diet Coke', 'price': 1.25, 'version': 1 },
{ 'item': 'Diet Pepsi', 'price': 1.50, 'version': 1 },
]})

db.foo.insert({
'date': '2011-05-01',
'region': 'NY',
'ranking': [
{ 'item': 'Diet Coke', 'price': 1.25, 'version': 1 },
{ 'item': 'Coca-Cola', 'price': 1.00, 'version': 1 },
{ 'item': 'Diet Pepsi', 'price': 1.50, 'version': 1 },
]})

db.foo.insert({
'date': '2011-06-01',
'region': 'NY',
'ranking': [
{ 'item': 'Coca-Cola', 'price': 1.00, 'version': 1 },
{ 'item': 'Diet Pepsi', 'price': 1.50, 'version': 1 },
{ 'item': 'Diet Coke', 'price': 1.25, 'version': 1 },
]})

def position_of(item, ranking):
    for i, candidate in enumerate(ranking):
            if candidate['item'] == item:
                    return i
    return None

print [position_of('Diet Coke', x['ranking'])
       for x in db.foo.find({'ranking.item': 'Diet Coke'}, ['ranking.item'])]

# prints [1, 0, 2]

In this (admittedly trivial) example, returning just a subset of fields may not show much benefit; however if your documents are especially large, doing may show performance improvements.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks dcrosta. Your answer strike me with an idea: I can use MongoDB map-reduce to find the position in mongodb server directly :D –  est Jul 12 '11 at 2:44

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