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using protobuf-net.dll Version 1.0.0.280

When I deserialize a DateTime (wrapped in an object) the date/time are ok but the DateTime.Kind property is 'Unspecified'

Consider this test case to serialize/deserialize a DateTime.

[TestMethod]
    public void TestDateTimeSerialization()
    {
        var obj = new DateTimeWrapper {Date = DateTime.UtcNow};
        obj.Date = DateTime.SpecifyKind(obj.Date, DateTimeKind.Utc);
        var serialized = obj.SerializeProto();
        var deserialized = serialized.DeserializeProto<DateTimeWrapper>();
        Assert.AreEqual(DateTimeKind.Utc, deserialized.Date.Kind);
    }

 public static byte[] SerializeProto<T>(this T item) where T : class
    {
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
        {
            Serializer.Serialize(ms, item);
            return ms.ToArray();
        }
    }

public static T DeserializeProto<T>(this byte[] raw) where T : class, new()
    {
        using (var ms = new MemoryStream(raw))
        {
            return Serializer.Deserialize<T>(ms);
        }
    }

The Assert fails, the Kind == Unspecified

Addendum

As a result of protobuf-net not serializing this property (see below) one solution is to simply assume DateTimeKind is equal to Utc when displaying dates on the client side (only where you know it should be UTC of course):

public static DateTime ToDisplayTime(this DateTime utcDateTime, TimeZoneInfo timezone)
{
    if (utcDateTime.Kind != DateTimeKind.Utc)//may be Unspecified due to serialization
        utcDateTime = DateTime.SpecifyKind(utcDateTime, DateTimeKind.Utc);
    DateTime result = TimeZoneInfo.ConvertTime(utcDateTime, timezone);
    return result;
}

This saves you having to assign to each DateTime property on the receiving side.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

protobuf.net has to maintain compatibility with the protobuf binary format, which is designed for the Java date/time datatypes. No Kind field in Java -> No Kind support in the protobuf binary format -> Kind not transferred across the network. Or something along those lines.

As it turns out, protobuf.net encodes the Ticks field (only), you'll find the code in BclHelpers.cs.

But feel free to add another field in your protobuf message definition for this value.

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Thanks. Do you know of other 'lossful' serialization as a result of the protobuf binary format? –  wal Jul 12 '11 at 3:52

As an extension to Ben's answer... strictly speaking, protobuf has no definition of time, so there is nothing to retain compatibility with. I'm tempted to add support for this in v2, but sadly it would add 2 bytes per value. I have yet to think about whether this is acceptable... for example, I could perhaps default to "unspecified" so that only explicitly local or UTC dates have a value.

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1  
Marc, why is DateTime treated different to a custom class created by a user (which has zero 'compatibility') - I would have expected the #1 priority ahead of size/speed was having the object recreated in its original state. –  wal Jul 12 '11 at 11:46
    
@wal perhaps it simply hasn't been an issue most times. I'm not against adding the "kind" to the v2 data if we need - just mentioning the impact, that's all. –  Marc Gravell Jul 12 '11 at 11:58
1  
It is common to store Dates in UTC. When they are sent over the wire protobuf loses this information (Kind)which means displaying it on the client side in their timezone will not work. I'm surprised no one has run into this earlier? –  wal Jul 12 '11 at 13:04
    
@MarcGravell, has anything changed in the current version? I am currently running into the exact same issue, I serialize utc and get back unspecified. Is there any simple workaround? Thanks –  Matt Wolf Apr 28 at 10:33

It might make more sense for protobuf to automatically deserialize the DateTime with the UtcKind, that way if you are using Utc as your base, which I think is best practice anyway, you wont have any issues.

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Here's an implementation for a workaround. Let me know if you can find a better solution. Thanks!

[ProtoContract(SkipConstructor = true)]
public class ProtoDateTime
{
    [ProtoIgnore]
    private DateTime? _val;

    [ProtoIgnore]
    private DateTime Value
    {
        get
        {
            if (_val != null)
            {
                return _val.Value;
            }
            lock (this)
            {
                if (_val != null)
                {
                    return _val.Value;
                }
                _val = new DateTime(DateTimeWithoutKind.Ticks, Kind);
            }
            return _val.Value;
        }
        set
        {
            lock (this)
            {
                _val = value;
                Kind = value.Kind;
                DateTimeWithoutKind = value;
            }
        }
    }

    [ProtoMember(1)]
    private DateTimeKind Kind { get; set; }
    [ProtoMember(2)]
    private DateTime DateTimeWithoutKind { get; set; }


    public static DateTime getValue(ref ProtoDateTime wrapper)
    {
        if (wrapper == null)
        {
            wrapper = new ProtoDateTime();
        }
        return wrapper.Value;
    }

    public static DateTime? getValueNullable(ref ProtoDateTime wrapper)
    {
        if (wrapper == null)
        {
            return null;
        }
        return wrapper.Value;

    }

    public static void setValue(out ProtoDateTime wrapper, DateTime value)
    {
        wrapper = new ProtoDateTime { Value = value };
    }

    public static void setValue(out ProtoDateTime wrapper, DateTime? newVal)
    {
        wrapper = newVal.HasValue ? new ProtoDateTime { Value = newVal.Value } : null;
    }
}

Usage:

[ProtoContract(SkipConstructor = true)]
public class MyClass
{
    [ProtoMember(3)]
    [XmlIgnore]
    private ProtoDateTime _timestampWrapper { get; set; }
    [ProtoIgnore]
    public DateTime Timestamp
    {
        get
        {
            return ProtoDateTime.getValue(ref _timestampWrapper);
        }
        set
        {
            return ProtoDateTime.setValue(out _timestampWrapper, value);
        }
    }

    [ProtoMember(4)]
    [XmlIgnore]
    private ProtoDateTime _nullableTimestampWrapper { get; set; }
    [ProtoIgnore]
    public DateTime? NullableTimestamp
    {
        get
        {
            return ProtoDateTime.getValueNullable(ref _nullableTimestampWrapper);
        }
        set
        {
            return ProtoDateTime.setValue(out _nullableTimestampWrapper, value);
        }
    }

}
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Another solution is to change kind property for DTO and always set it to UTC. This may not be acceptable for all the application, but works for me

class DateTimeWrapper 
{
    private DateTime _date;

    public DateTime Date 
    {
        get { return _date; }
        set { _date = new DateTime(value.Ticks, DateTimeKind.Utc);}
    }
}
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