Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using a 128 bit integer counter in the very inner loops of my C++ code. (Irrelevant background: The actual application is evaluating finite difference equations on a regular grid, which involves repetitively incrementing large integers, and even 64 bits isn't enough precision because small rounding accumulates enough to affect the answers.)

I've represented the integer as two 64 bit unsigned longs. I now need to increment those values by a 128 bit constant. This isn't hard, but you have to manually catch the carry from the low word to the high word.

I have working code something like this:

inline void increment128(unsigned long &hiWord, unsigned long &loWord)
  {
    const unsigned long hiAdd=0x0000062DE49B5241;
    const unsigned long loAdd=0x85DC198BCDD714BA;

    loWord += loAdd;
    if (loWord < loAdd) ++hiWord; // test_and_add_carry
    hiWord += hiAdd;
  }

This is tight and simple code. It works.

Unfortunately this is about 20% of my runtime. The killer line is that loWord test. If I remove it, I obviously get the wrong answers but the runtime overhead drops from 20% to 4%! So that carry test is especially expensive!

My question: Does C++ expose the hardware carry flags, even as an extension to GCC? It seems like the additions could be done without the test-and-add-carry line above if the actual compiled instructions used an add using last carry instruction for the hiWord addition. Is there a way to rewrite the test-and-add-carry line to get the compiler to use the intrinsic opcode?

share|improve this question
2  
If this function is the showstopper, write it in inline assembly and you can deal with your carry efficiently : it's quite short so it should be manageable (even better, you could use SSE/MMX extensions and directly calculate in 128bits) –  Bruce Jul 12 '11 at 5:27
    
@Bruce — It's probably the branch instruction rather than the function per se. –  Todd Lehman Jan 2 '13 at 6:58
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Actually gcc will use the carry automatically if you write your code carefully...

I compiled this code with gcc -O2 -Wall -Werror -S:

void increment128_1(unsigned long &hiWord, unsigned long &loWord)
{
    const unsigned long hiAdd=0x0000062DE49B5241;
    const unsigned long loAdd=0x85DC198BCDD714BA;

    loWord += loAdd;
    if (loWord < loAdd) ++hiWord; // test_and_add_carry                                                                                                             
    hiWord += hiAdd;
}

void increment128_2(unsigned long &hiWord, unsigned long &loWord)
{
    const unsigned long hiAdd=0x0000062DE49B5241;
    const unsigned long loAdd=0x85DC198BCDD714BA;

    loWord += loAdd;
    hiWord += hiAdd;
    hiWord += (loWord < loAdd); // test_and_add_carry                                                                                                               
}

This is the assembly for increment128_1:

.cfi_startproc
        movabsq     $-8801131483544218438, %rax
        addq        (%rsi), %rax
        movabsq     $-8801131483544218439, %rdx
        cmpq        %rdx, %rax
        movq        %rax, (%rsi)
        ja  .L5
        movq        (%rdi), %rax
        addq        $1, %rax
.L3:
        movabsq     $6794178679361, %rdx
        addq        %rdx, %rax
        movq        %rax, (%rdi)
        ret

...and this is the assembly for increment128_2:

        movabsq     $-8801131483544218438, %rax
        addq        %rax, (%rsi)
        movabsq     $6794178679361, %rax
        addq        (%rdi), %rax
        movabsq     $-8801131483544218439, %rdx
        movq        %rax, (%rdi)
        cmpq        %rdx, (%rsi)
        setbe       %dl
        movzbl      %dl, %edx
        leaq        (%rdx,%rax), %rax
        movq        %rax, (%rdi)
        ret

Note the lack of conditional branches in the second version.

[edit]

Also, references are often bad for performance, because GCC has to worry about aliasing... It is often better to just pass things by value. Consider:

struct my_uint128_t {
    unsigned long hi;
    unsigned long lo;
};

my_uint128_t increment128_3(my_uint128_t x)
{
    const unsigned long hiAdd=0x0000062DE49B5241;
    const unsigned long loAdd=0x85DC198BCDD714BA;

    x.lo += loAdd;
    x.hi += hiAdd + (x.lo < loAdd);
    return x;
}

Assembly:

        .cfi_startproc
        movabsq     $-8801131483544218438, %rdx
        movabsq     $-8801131483544218439, %rax
        movabsq     $6794178679362, %rcx
        addq        %rsi, %rdx
        cmpq        %rdx, %rax
        sbbq        %rax, %rax
        addq        %rcx, %rax
        addq        %rdi, %rax
        ret

This is actually the tightest code of the three.

...OK so none of them actually used the carry automatically :-). But they do avoid the conditional branch, which I bet is the slow part (since the branch prediction logic will get it wrong half the time).

[edit 2]

And one more, which I stumbled across doing a little searching. Did you know GCC has built-in support for 128-bit integers?

typedef unsigned long my_uint128_t __attribute__ ((mode(TI)));

my_uint128_t increment128_4(my_uint128_t x)
{
    const my_uint128_t hiAdd=0x0000062DE49B5241;
    const unsigned long loAdd=0x85DC198BCDD714BA;

    return x + (hiAdd << 64) + loAdd;
}

The assembly for this one is about as good as it gets:

        .cfi_startproc
        movabsq     $-8801131483544218438, %rax
        movabsq     $6794178679361, %rdx
        pushq       %rbx
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
        addq        %rdi, %rax
        adcq        %rsi, %rdx
        popq        %rbx
        .cfi_offset 3, -16
        .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
        ret

(Not sure where the push/pop of ebx came from, but this is still not bad.)

All of these are with GCC 4.5.2, by the way.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, the very last one has the adc instruction you're looking for –  gordy Jul 12 '11 at 5:55
    
@Gordy: Indeed. I am a little surprised I could not coax GCC into generating it otherwise... I could have sworn I had seen it do so at some point (and not with the "TI" mode type). –  Nemo Jul 12 '11 at 5:57
    
This is a terrific analysis! I'll be marking this as the correct answer, but bruce brings up a good point in his comment: why not just use an ASM include? I made a second answer below just to document it, even though this answer here by Nemo will be the best reference. –  Randall Meyers Jul 12 '11 at 21:36
1  
@Randall: The asm solution works, but it is specific to x86_64. The 128-bit GCC integers will work on any platform that has GCC, and the other suggestions will work anywhere you have a C++ compiler. You might think you can ignore such concerns, but years of experience suggest you will live to regret it if you do :-). Only go the full asm route if you simply cannot get adequate performance any other way; and if you do use it, be sure to limit it to a single module if possible. –  Nemo Jul 12 '11 at 21:55
1  
@Nemo: does gcc support __int128_t on 32-bit platforms now? it didn't at some point in the past. –  Stephen Canon Jul 12 '11 at 22:24
show 1 more comment

The best answer, of course, is to use the built-in __int128_t support.

Alternatively, use an inline asm. I prefer to use the named-argument form:

__asm("add %[alo], %[wlo]\n"
      "adc %[ahi], %[whi]"
      : [wlo] "+r" (loWord), [whi] "+r" (hiWord)
      : [alo] "r" (loAdd), [ahi] "r" (hiAdd));
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.