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I have a class called Prescriptions. It has properties that are other classes. So, for example, a property name of Fills would be from the PDInt class which has other properties about the value that I need.

If I want to set the value of the Fills property in the Prescription class it would be something like

Prescription p = new Prescription(); p.Fills.Value = 33;

So now I want to take the name of the Fills property and stuff it in a the tag property in a winform control.

this.txtFills.Tag = p.Fills.GetType().Name;

However when I do this, I get the base class of the property, not the property name. So instead of getting "Fills", I get "PDInt".

How do I get the instantiated name of the property?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
Just try googling "c# reflection property name", first hit csharp-examples.net/reflection-property-names –  Adriaan Stander Jul 12 '11 at 4:29
    
Astander, thank you for the link, but this is not what I am looking for. I don't want to have to reflect the parent class and iterate through it to find a single property. I want to fill a group of edit controls with property names from my class and am looking for a way of taking a single property that is a class and getting it's instantiated name. –  MikeMalter Jul 12 '11 at 15:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Below is an extension method that I use it when I wanna work like you:

public static class ModelHelper
{
    public static string Item<T>(this T obj, Expression<Func<T, object>> expression)
    {
        if (expression.Body is MemberExpression)
        {
            return ((MemberExpression)(expression.Body)).Member.Name;
        }
        if (expression.Body is UnaryExpression)
        {
            return ((MemberExpression)((UnaryExpression)(expression.Body)).Operand)
                    .Member.Name;
        }
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
    }
}

use it as :

var name = p.Item(x=>x.Fills);

For detail about how method works see Expression Tree in .Net

share|improve this answer
    
+1 its good one buddy –  Pranay Rana Jul 12 '11 at 5:11
    
+1. Dude, I can't believe you did that. Perfect example of what I needed. I have been seeing Expression Trees on the periphery for a while. I am going to have to brush up on it and learn more. Thank you very much. –  MikeMalter Jul 12 '11 at 15:16
    
@MikeMalter,@Pranay Rana, thanks. –  Saeed Amiri Jul 12 '11 at 15:34

Check this blogpost which is helpful : http://handcraftsman.wordpress.com/2008/11/11/how-to-get-c-property-names-without-magic-strings/

Do this you need to make USe of reflection feature of .net framework.

Something like this

Type type = test.GetType();

PropertyInfo[] propInfos = type.GetProperties();
for (int i = 0; i < propInfos.Length; i++) 
{
    PropertyInfo pi = (PropertyInfo)propInfos.GetValue(i);
    string propName = pi.Name;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
U can use expression tree without reflection with more usable code. –  Saeed Amiri Jul 12 '11 at 4:38
1  
blog post good, your example code bad (it's exactly what the blog author is trying to avoid) –  Ben Voigt Jul 12 '11 at 4:40
    
@Ben Voigt - thanks for the respose......... –  Pranay Rana Jul 12 '11 at 5:13
    
Pranay, thanks for the answer. What I was looking for was posted by Saeed above. –  MikeMalter Jul 12 '11 at 15:17

You can get you like as this ? ↓

public class Prescription
{
    public PDInt Fills;
}

public class PDInt 
{
    public int Value;
}




Prescription p = new Prescription();
foreach(var x in p.GetType().GetFields())
{
    // var type = x.GetType();  // PDInt or X //Fills
}
share|improve this answer
    
Scott, thanks for the example. I don't want to have to reflect the parent class and iterate through it to find a single property. I want to fill a group of edit controls with property names from my class and am looking for a way of taking a single property that is a class and getting it's instantiated name. Make sense? –  MikeMalter Jul 12 '11 at 15:09
    
@MikeMalter OH...yes, I'm sorry but I can catch you mean now... And I also found a Perfect example above.... Thank you~~ –  shenhengbin Jul 13 '11 at 5:33

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