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So I have made a clock, it works great. Now I want to move the javascript into an external file and link to it with

<SCRIPT  type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript" src="clock.js"
</SCRIPT>

I can not figure out how to keep it updating though. I have tried a few things and the results where: time is static at when the page loads, the prints across the screen for every update, and no time at all.

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
function startTime()
{
var today=new Date();
var h=today.getHours();
var m=today.getMinutes();
var s=today.getSeconds();
// add a zero in front of numbers<10
m=checkTime(m);
s=checkTime(s);
document.getElementById('txt').innerHTML=h+":"+m+":"+s;
t=setTimeout('startTime()',500);
}

function checkTime(i)
{
if (i<10)
  {
  i="0" + i;
  }
return i;
}
</script>
</head>

<body onload="startTime()">
<div id="txt"></div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
1  
Instead of setTimeout, try setInterval, and don't use quotes in the setInterval (just do setInterval(startTime, 500)). –  tjameson Jul 12 '11 at 5:09
    
@travis, - tjameson is right, use setInterval, setTimeout runs a function once at given interval, like delaying it. setInterval runs a function continuous at a given inteval. You can stop the function using removeInterval(intervalId) –  dpp Jul 12 '11 at 5:13
    
@tjameson - The existing setTimeout is the last line of the function that will be called by the timeout, so replacing that with setInterval would be a very bad idea. Removing it from the function altogether and using setInterval in the onload handler would be fine. –  nnnnnn Jul 12 '11 at 5:19
    
@ tjameson That did it, but it is quit jumpy. missing 2 or 3 seconds in both chrome and firefox.... –  travis Jul 12 '11 at 5:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's how I would do it. Put this code in your external js file:

function startTime() {
    var today=new Date(),
        h=today.getHours(),
        m=today.getMinutes(),
        s=today.getSeconds();

    // add a zero in front of numbers<10
    m=checkTime(m);
    s=checkTime(s);
    document.getElementById('txt').innerHTML=h+":"+m+":"+s;
}

function checkTime(i) {
    if (i<10) {
        i="0" + i;
    }
    return i;
}

And then in your main html page, something like this:

<body onload="setInterval(startTime, 500);">
share|improve this answer
    
<body onload="setInterval(function(){ startTime('txt'); }, 500);"> is my suggestion - pass the ID of the div element to the startTime function, which in turn will be modified to take an ID as a parameter, so that it can easily be applied to multiple pages with elements that have different IDs. –  nnnnnn Jul 12 '11 at 5:41

You're missing ending >

<SCRIPT type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript" src="clock.js">

so it should be

<SCRIPT  type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript" src="clock.js">
</SCRIPT>
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, that was just a post mistake, but good eye. –  travis Jul 12 '11 at 5:18
    
so just try to remove language="JavaScript" I'm not sure it should be there –  genesis Jul 12 '11 at 5:20
    
and also, open your firebug (Firefox for example) to web tab and tell me: does clock.js download itself ? –  genesis Jul 12 '11 at 5:21

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