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I'd like to count/sum up the overhead in an object file due to packing (and, ideally, have gcc minimize it for me).

For example, consider the following structure (32 bit x86, gcc):

struct a { 
    uint8_t a_char;
    uint32_t an_integer
    uint8_t another_letter;
};

While the actual data only takes up 6 bytes, the structure takes up 12 bytes in memory because both chars are followed by 3 padding bytes. By reordering the structure as follows:

struct b { 
    uint32_t an_integer
    uint8_t a_char;
    uint8_t another_letter;
};

The structure will only have sizeof(struct b) == 8 (still 4 bytes of overhead).

(1) Ideally, I'd like for gcc to rearrange struct a to struct b and save me the space, but my version (4.2) doesn't seem to do this for any optimization level.

(2) Alternatively, given struct a, I'd like to (automatically) get either the number 6 (total amount of overhead) or 4 (minimal amount of overhead, if members are ordered "ideally"). The purpose of this is to determine whether or not manually reordering structures is worth the time (likely not).

Is there a way for gcc to do (1), and is there a tool that would perform (2)? The closest thing I can think of for (1) is #pragma pack(1), but (I'm guessing) it would have serious performance implications by making most/all memory accesses unaligned. For (2), I'm thinking a Perl script parsing debugging symbols might be able to do this, but I'm not familiar enough with DWARF to know for sure.

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AFAIK unaligned memory accesses are as fast as aligned accesses; it's just that the compiler doesn't perform some optimizations on them. – Mehrdad Jul 12 '11 at 6:55
3  
Unaligned memory accesses can cause a SIGBUS with 4- or 8- byte types - they are important. – trojanfoe Jul 12 '11 at 6:58
1  
@Mehrdad: Some architectures have zero tolerance for unaligned memory access and will throw a hardware exception when that happens. In that case the operating system intercepts them and emulates unaligned memory access in software, which is much slower than aligned access. Even on "unaligned-access-tolerant" architectures like x86 unaligned accesses are slower and some instructions (e.g. SIMD) have strict alignment requirements. – In silico Jul 12 '11 at 6:59
1  
@Mehrdad, on x86 there is a performance difference for aligned vs. unaligned despite being the same instruction (how appreciable that is depends on your code). The CPU simply has more work to do -- especially if you are crossing a cache-line boundary. More so certain guarantees about atomicity only apply to aligned values. – edA-qa mort-ora-y Jul 12 '11 at 7:50
1  
Really, how hard is it? A naive solution is to just write all your structures with their elements sorted in decreasing size... You don't really need tools to do this for you. – R.. Jul 12 '11 at 7:56
up vote 8 down vote accepted

For #1, the reason it's not done is that both the C and C++ standards prohibit structure member reordering.

Yes, struct packing will generally reduce performance. And, as mentioned in a comment, in some cases on non-x86 architectures you can get a SIGBUS if you try to operate on a member.

For #2, yes a perl script might be able to do it. Instead of parsing DWARF info, you could try scanning the source code for struct definitions, and maybe generate some small test programs to check the sizeof() of structs and members and so on.

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1  
1 - you're right, I found it. "Within a structure object, the non-bit-field members and the units in which bit-fields reside have addresses that increase in the order in which they are declared." - open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1124.pdf . Sigh. Thanks. – Jacob Jul 12 '11 at 7:14
    
It could be added that even if it could reorder it might not help, since it must each member must still satisfy alignment requirements when placed in an array, and various orders on the stack. – edA-qa mort-ora-y Jul 12 '11 at 7:54
1  
One further performance issue to consider is that re-ordering the struct elements may in some cases result in a less favourable cache/memory access pattern and so worse performance, even though less memory is being used in total. – Paul R Jul 12 '11 at 8:06

In linux there is a tool called pahole that will parse an ELF file with debug information and printout for each struct what each of the member's alignment is and how much padding is done by the compiler. You can use that information to guide you into manually packing if you notice that there is too much overhead.

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This cannot always be done the problem is that access to unaligned memory isn't allowed on all architectures. This also simplifies some code for the compiler allowing to optimize certain accesses on the memory itself. Also reorganizing structures is probably not worth your time as 4-8 bytes of overhead per structure isn't a large deal unless you're running VERY memory sensitive software. As for your question I'm not sure if there is a way but I'm sure if someone knows they will let you know (maybe gcc-4.6 with highest optimization flag does it?)

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