Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am making a win32 api program. I first created a base class called WinClass and inherited like a dozen other classes from it. Now I need to create a derived class from two classes inherited from base class WinControl and WinHandler.Since I intend to make many more derived classes out of the original dozen, I'll have to use virtual inheritance on like every class inherited from WinClass.So is there any way to do this without using virtual inheritance?

share|improve this question
1  
What functionality is WinClass providing? –  Charles Bailey Jul 12 '11 at 7:56
    
Just simple abstract virtual functions. It also contains protected HWND _hwnd and the HWND() operator –  ApprenticeHacker Jul 12 '11 at 7:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Learn how to avoid overuse of inheritance at all. For example, read this article

http://berniesumption.com/software/inheritance-is-evil-and-must-be-destroyed/

A good start to learn how to get things done the way you want it (with the correct use of inheritance) is the book "Design Patterns":

http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?DesignPatternsBook

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Judging from the articles, I'm an even worse programmer than I thought I was. :( . they were informative though, :) (+1) –  ApprenticeHacker Jul 12 '11 at 8:12
1  
In general I find the axiom "prefer composition over inheritance" has served me well. In other words try wrapping functionality instead of just including it. –  Dennis Jul 12 '11 at 8:32

I first created a base class called WinClass and inherited like a dozen other classes from it.

And there's your first problem. If WPF has taught us anything, it should be that inheritance is not necessarily the best model for GUI design.

So is there any way to do this WITHOUT using virtual inheritance?

Yes: don't have WinControl and WinHandler be derived from WinClass. You haven't said what these do, so I can't offer any specific advice about them. Really, it seems like what you need is a "has a" relationship rather than the "is a" relationship that inheritance brings.

Also, there's no need to use boldface for class names. Just use the code tags that StackOverflow provides. Nor is there a need to SHOUT in bold-face.

share|improve this answer
    
"If WPF has taught us anything, it should be that inheritance is not necessarily the best model for GUI design." Are you suggesting I should create an xml parser? –  ApprenticeHacker Jul 12 '11 at 8:05
    
@burningprodigy: You can use WPF without XAML or XML of any kind. I was alluding to the way WPF handles its class hierarchy, which is very flat. You customize WPF application, not by deriving new types (usually), but by linking your data structures to specific controls in the window, through the use of a template object, which itself is typically built through composition ("has a" rather than "is a"). Personally, I think every GUI designer should be familiar with WPF; that's not to say that every GUI should look like that, but it really shows how containment can make a better GUI API. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 12 '11 at 8:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.